Care Homes for "Younger" People

CocoaPops

New member
Mar 18, 2019
3
Hi All

My Father is 68 has been in a mental health unit for several months, under section 3 of the mental health act.

Sadly, we're moving closer to a Lewy Body diagnosis and the hospital are saying that we need to find him a residential home. He visited one yesterday and instantly dismissed it saying it was too old for him, which I have to agree with.

Up until last December my Dad was a very young 67 year old, playing loads of sport, hugely sociable etc and then suddenly everything changed. Although he now needs support, he still has some capacity to make decisions about where he stays and it feels wrong to deny him of his wants.

The homes we've visited so far have been lovely but the residents are much older than him. Is this something he/we have got to accept? Or are there alternatives? Also, will his opinion get listened to or can the system force him somewhere against his will?

Best wishes

CP
 

karaokePete

Registered User
Jul 23, 2017
5,091
N Ireland
This is a perennial problem for the 'younger' people with dementia.

My wife was diagnosed in her early 60's and we found that all support services in our area were geared towards people 20 years older. However, my wife is still younger than your father and now fits in well at Day Care as she has become more accepting of things as her dementia progresses.

There is a web-site that gives details of Care Homes that can be reached by clicking the following link. A postcode search can be done and you will see that many CH's list their facilities and often reviews have been posted by users. I hope that is of some use to you
https://www.carehome.co.uk/

If your father isn't self funding, or the family prepared to pay a 'top up', choice can be severely limited as, I think, the LA only have a duty to find one CH that meets actual care needs and accepts their rates.
 

Abbey82

Registered User
Jun 12, 2018
75
We are going through the same thing, my Dad is 61 and currently under a section 3, although he has no mental capacity at all. Unfortunately there are no real care homes for younger people, unless they are for young adults suffering mental health/brain type illnesses/damage.

We've also found that whilst some homes appear to be new, modern and very nice looking, the care and cqc reports tell a different story. Vice versa, the older, more dated/older age decor homes have a good care record and cqc report. We've learnt it really is about the carers and how they treat my dad, but its a tough one to swallow as I know my Dad, under normal circumstances wouldn't choose these places.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
12,669
England
My husband was 62 when diagnosed with Alzheimers. He was 69 when he went into nursing care. He too was very agile, in fact too agile, constantly walking. He was younger than the other men on his floor but it was the care he needed and the age of the other residents was not taken into account.

He settled and the other men became part of his family as did they mine. They were different ages but they all needed the same care. He was there for 4 years and he still remained the youngest there.

I suppose we were lucky because my husband was passed having an opinion on anything and was accepting of everything as long as I was around. I don’t think any of us would choose residential living but sadly there comes a time when it is necessary. I hope you manage to find somewhere that is acceptable to your Dad and he settles.
 

tss502

Registered User
Oct 20, 2014
110
Hi,
I'm going through the same thing at the moment with my OH, who is 60. Like my OH, your father has been sectioned under section 3, which means he is entitled to section 117 after-care funding which will fund his care costs. I've been told that, where I am, the local council will provide a list of care homes which they fund under section 117. I am able to visit these homes and identify any specific preferences (eg: somewhere which is within reasonable travelling distance) but ultimately the decision will come down to who has beds at the time, and which is cheapest. I think you should be engaging with your social worker about the process, and make it clear about your father's need to be somewhere with younger people. There may not be anywhere which fits the bill in the end, but you can at least express the preference and social services should do their best to try and meet this.
 

Abbey82

Registered User
Jun 12, 2018
75
Hi,
I'm going through the same thing at the moment with my OH, who is 60. Like my OH, your father has been sectioned under section 3, which means he is entitled to section 117 after-care funding which will fund his care costs. I've been told that, where I am, the local council will provide a list of care homes which they fund under section 117. I am able to visit these homes and identify any specific preferences (eg: somewhere which is within reasonable travelling distance) but ultimately the decision will come down to who has beds at the time, and which is cheapest. I think you should be engaging with your social worker about the process, and make it clear about your father's need to be somewhere with younger people. There may not be anywhere which fits the bill in the end, but you can at least express the preference and social services should do their best to try and meet this.
Hi there,

sorry to hear you are going through try same also. Our social worker actually said that I can provide them with a list of homes we want to look at and they will assess them also, they don’t have a specified list to choose from which is refreshing to know. He did say too that they understood because of dads complex needs that it may require more funding than normal which they did accept. Again, I was assuming the cheapest would be the only option. I do have a list of local homes that are definite no-go’s but at the end of the day we’ll see how it pans out. Ultimately we need to find a bed in the best place possible but the MH unit did also say that he can stay as long as is needed.
Where are you based out of interest?

Adele
 

faz42

Registered User
May 23, 2016
21
Hi,

Please don't get too disheartened. There are homes out there for people with early onset dementia. My mother in law is 63 and been in a home in st Helens, merseyside for the last 2 years. This is a unit within a larger home that is specifically for early onset dementia and as such only takes people under pension age.

Prior to this she was in a emi home with older people and this did not meet her needs. With 117 funding it is important to point out that social needs is very important and extra funding can be found.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
19,705
North Manchester
Some members have mentioned above that they expect future funding to be under s117.
It's worth noting that s117 is one of the two cases where first party top-up is allowed if a more expensive home than offered is preferred.