1. Marianne

    Marianne Registered User

    Jul 5, 2008
    301
    NW England
    Margaret
    It is very unusual for a person needing EMI healthcare not to be at least awarded banding. I fought for NHSCHC which took me 2 years and I was awarded back all the fees plus interest for the whole of the time my dad was in care.

    Please read ************ I found this site gave me the confidence to fight on.
     
  2. Marianne

    Marianne Registered User

    Jul 5, 2008
    301
    NW England
    Lilacwarm,quote: she has longterm health conditions but these have been determined as controlable.

    Please read the National Framework which is used by PCT's to assess and as it states, "A well managed need is still a need". If the home are controlling the condition by medication it does not mean she has been cured of that condition, and unless they can prove she is fully cured of that condition then it has to be taken into consideration.
     
  3. EllieS

    EllieS Registered User

    Aug 23, 2005
    170
    SOMERSET
    If your Mum's need is primarily a medical one

    SHE IS ENTITLED TO CONTINUING CARE.

    Having spent thousands of pounds of Solicitors I now have an advocate who deals with all of this for me.

    I got to a stage where I've told them I don't have any money to pay top-ups or anything else, and that Mum's actual cash is well below what it should be (I'll probably be imprisoned for using this to help pay for her care). Mum's flat is still there - untouched, not rented out, not sold, just there!! They've not put a charge on it - I've resisted that.

    Anyway, at present I'm paying absolutely nothing toward Mum's care, and neither is she - her state pension and personal pension is being banked and staying banked.

    The powers that be have been advised that they should not make any changes to Mum's accommodation until they have proven that she is NOT entitled to continuing care.

    It all frightens me s---less really, but it's the principle that I'm sticking out for. There is NO WAY ON THIS EARTH that Mum would be where she is IF she did not have (and has been diagnosed) with Alzheimers!

    I really am not sure what to recommend to you because - in truth, this side of things is not doing me any good and sometimes I wonder if it's worth it - but Dad worked so flipping hard and he only ever wanted what he did have to be passed on to his children.

    Hope I haven't opened something that you wish would stay closed!!

    Best wishes
    Ellie
     
  4. mumof3

    mumof3 Registered User

    Feb 6, 2006
    82
    Hi there

    Just wanted to say that my MIL has been in an EMI unit of a NH for the last 6 weeks and that it does seem to be more suited to her than the main elderly frail unit of the same NH. We were told that my MIL needed a NH but not an EMI unit when we originally started looking at homes a few months ago but when she entered the home as an emergency following a crises she was very agitated and restless and has remained that way. She definitely needs the higher staff ratios in the EMI unit.

    I'm really not sure other than the secure premises and the presence of qualified nurses (which presumably would be the case in any nursing home) what the differences are.

    My MIL is not problematic during the night, disturbing other residents so I'm not sure how they would deal with that though Margaret. We've been told that they will be able to cope with agressive incidents which was one of our concerns after various incidents.

    Also wanted to say that when we looked at various NH's we made sure to ask what would happen when my MIL's money ran out. Most of them said that the LA would then pay (at the vastly reduced rate) so I think this must be very common. All the rooms are identical so my MIL would be able to stay in the same room.
     
  5. Marianne

    Marianne Registered User

    Jul 5, 2008
    301
    NW England
    mumof3 Was your relatives needs reassessed when she was found needing EMI care 6 weeks ago.Her needs have obviously changed.

    The home should be requesting an assessment but you can do this yourself. Alzheimers Society have a very good article on Continuing Healthcare with a template letter which you would need to send to the PCT.
     
  6. EllieS

    EllieS Registered User

    Aug 23, 2005
    170
    SOMERSET
    If the EMI Unit is a reasonably good one........

    I think the staff are better qualified/trained to use distracting techniques which can sometimes minimise residents agitation.

    Having said that, I also think when a person is particularly disruptive they get the GP to prescribe sedatives - which is not really great - but then if they didn't do this and the disruption continued I think the next step would be for the resident to be sectioned - which is something to be avoided wherever possible.

    Having said that, I believe I'm right in saying that if a patient is sectioned (not just the 72 hour section - can't remember the correct terminology) thereafer they ARE entitled to Continuing Care.

    I know when Mum was in hospital she got really agitated and ended up having a 72-hour section applied, as soon as this was lifted - we got her out of there before she got more agitated which would definitely have resulted in a full section being applied. Makes you wonder what to do doesn't it? In doing what we felt was right at that time has made it really hard to get what's right by way of continuing care for Mum now!

    I guess things will get better for us all - just a question of when!

    Best wishes

    Ellie
     

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