Care home staff testing for Covid

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,164
Victoria, Australia
My son manages a company that manufactures steel fabrication for construction. Every employee has to undergo drug and alcohol testing as dangerous machinery is involved. No test, no work. They make the choice and refusal to take the test means that they have made the choice not to work.

I have no idea of why care workers can't do the same. My guess is that if health care workers don't have the flu jab (unless there have been serious reactions before) they can't work in a health/care environment.

Many years ago, I was working at a medical school at an interstate university and everybody, without exception was required to have a smallpox vaccination which was part of the successful drive to eradicate the disease globally.

I don't like being told what to do either but there are times when personal preferences have to be put aside for a little while.
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
775
My son manages a company that manufactures steel fabrication for construction. Every employee has to undergo drug and alcohol testing as dangerous machinery is involved. No test, no work. They make the choice and refusal to take the test means that they have made the choice not to work.

I have no idea of why care workers can't do the same. My guess is that if health care workers don't have the flu jab (unless there have been serious reactions before) they can't work in a health/care environment.

Many years ago, I was working at a medical school at an interstate university and everybody, without exception was required to have a smallpox vaccination which was part of the successful drive to eradicate the disease globally.

I don't like being told what to do either but there are times when personal preferences have to be put aside for a little while.
That’s interesting, I have a friend who does this type of testing during the interview process for companies. It is followed up during employment by random testing of members of staff. As you say no test or failing the tests means no job offer.
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
775
Just to let you all know I received a reply to my e mail regarding care home staff being tested. It said that due to data protection the information couldn’t shared but the offer of testing had been received favourably by staff. It doesn’t take away from the fact that I know at least one member of staff had refused because it would make her gag.
There is a rehabilitation unit at the home which was staffed by the day to day staff so asked one of the senior staff on Sunday about this and was relieved to find out that it is being staffed totally separately by NHS staff during this pandemic.
 

Sirena

Registered User
Feb 27, 2018
2,294
My guess is that if health care workers don't have the flu jab (unless there have been serious reactions before) they can't work in a health/care environment.
That isn't the case in the UK. The flu jab is recommended, but HCPs choose whether or not to have it, and uptake isn't great.

 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
2,164
Victoria, Australia
That isn't the case in the UK. The flu jab is recommended, but HCPs choose whether or not to have it, and uptake isn't great.

It is all quite strange isn't it. A few years ago, I took up a part time job caring for a baby so the first thing I did was to go and have a whooping cough vaccination so in my opinion people who are involved in the care of people at risk, young and old, it is just something you do.

I know our care worker was vaccinated for flu as part of a program to protect her and her clients. It just makes sense at a health level as well as economically.
 

imthedaughter

Registered User
Apr 3, 2019
518
Yes I remember asking my swim school if they would encourage teachers to take the flu jab - I have it free each year anyway so always get it - and they wouldn't respond to me, which I took as a no. Considering how many colds I've picked up teaching small children at close quarters in warm moist environments, I think it would be sensible, and same for carers.
 

Zara09

New member
Feb 8, 2019
8
It’s crazy isn’t it. No staff or residents in mums care home been tested yet. However, 20 miles away (a different council) they have a bus that goes around all of the care homes, in a loop, testing, retesting. As said, with this virus, I needs to be regular. Lots of people as we know are asymptotic.
 

Louie16

Registered User
Mar 31, 2020
35
It’s crazy isn’t it. No staff or residents in mums care home been tested yet. However, 20 miles away (a different council) they have a bus that goes around all of the care homes, in a loop, testing, retesting. As said, with this virus, I needs to be regular. Lots of people as we know are asymptotic.
Hi mums care home .All residents tested last Thursday, but not staff, they're still waiting. Results back show ,2 residents have test positive but are asymptomatic. Care home email Tues saying all residents now in quarantine, no phone calls or what's app calls ' to reduce contact ' . I've written to query this and as for more details as unclear what they're actually meaning re daily care . Anyone else having similar messages from CH ?
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,578
You're getting more information than I'm receiving from mum's care home! @Louie16 . There was an outbreak in mum's home but the personal care continued as usual during quarantine. The suspension of phone or what'sapp calls at the moment could be because they have only just found out that they have the virus in the home so there will be an extra strain on their resources for a while eg managing the quarantine, ensuring infection control is effective etc. I think it's understandable under the circumstances that contact with relatives via calls might be lower down the priority list at the moment. Plus this will also reduce the amount of times that residents will have contact with staff, who will be having contact with other residents, so it's good practice in terms of infection control to keep contact to a minimum at this time.
 
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Sirena

Registered User
Feb 27, 2018
2,294
It is all quite strange isn't it. A few years ago, I took up a part time job caring for a baby so the first thing I did was to go and have a whooping cough vaccination so in my opinion people who are involved in the care of people at risk, young and old, it is just something you do.

I know our care worker was vaccinated for flu as part of a program to protect her and her clients. It just makes sense at a health level as well as economically.
The residents in my mother's CH all have annual flu jabs. I don't know if the staff all do too, but as the residents are vaccinated it doesn't really matter, except in the sense that staff risk being off sick. I would have thought all HCPs and carers would want a flu jab for their own sake, but apparently not. I wonder if the pandemic will change attitudes though, now they have seen people seriously ill with a virus.
 

Louie16

Registered User
Mar 31, 2020
35
You're getting more information than I'm receiving from mum's care home! @Louie16 . There was an outbreak in mum's home but the personal care continued as usual during quarantine. The suspension of phone or what'sapp calls at the moment could be because they have only just found out that they have the virus in the home so there will be an extra strain on their resources for a while eg managing the quarantine, ensuring infection control is effective etc. I think it's understandable under the circumstances that contact with relatives via calls might be lower down the priority list at the moment. Plus this will also reduce the amount of times that residents will have contact with staff, who will be having contact with other residents, so it's good practice in terms of infection control to keep contact to a minimum at this time.
Hi yes thanks am hoping it's only for very short period, although she doesn't comprehend the phone and WhatsApp because of her dementia. Sadly she's gone downhill cognitively over last 10 weeks and doesn't really recognise me anymore on calls. I fear she will forget me altogether now, although I could keep bit of a check on her whilst making calls so that was important still. I am concerned that they just get left in their rooms and are very isolated. I think care homes do have to start planning how they can maintain residents wellbeing and keep communication going otherwise that is neglect also, this virus is going be around a long time sadly. Hope your mum stays well.
 

Louise7

Registered User
Mar 25, 2016
2,578
Thanks - mum tested negative so fingers crossed she stays well :) I'm also worried that she will forget me due to losing the connection we had as a result of regular visits. She still seems to recognise my voice but it's not the same as her seeing me - her little face used to light up as soon as she saw me. I've been receiving some photos but haven't seen her in person for 2 months now, not even through a window. I agree with you that steps need to be taken with regards to maintaining the connection between residents & family when technology isn't able to do so, and hope that there will be some movement with regards to this soon as continuing with a 'no visits' policy isn't sustainable long term.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,891
South coast
Id just like to mention to all you lovely people who are worried about their PWD forgetting them

When mum was alive and living in her care home I had a period of about 3 months when OH was having a lot of problems, visits to doctors in London (2 of them for a week of tests so we both stayed there), things happening so that I didnt feel I could leave him, so the long and short of it is that I wasnt able to visit mum at all during this period. When I went back, she had no problem remembering me and obviously had no idea that it was so long since I had previously visited. So, you, see, forgetting is not inevitable.
 

Louie16

Registered User
Mar 31, 2020
35
Thanks - mum tested negative so fingers crossed she stays well :) I'm also worried that she will forget me due to losing the connection we had as a result of regular visits. She still seems to recognise my voice but it's not the same as her seeing me - her little face used to light up as soon as she saw me. I've been receiving some photos but haven't seen her in person for 2 months now, not even through a window. I agree with you that steps need to be taken with regards to maintaining the connection between residents & family when technology isn't able to do so, and hope that there will be some movement with regards to this soon as continuing with a 'no visits' policy isn't sustainable long term.
👍Yes absolutely
 

Louie16

Registered User
Mar 31, 2020
35
Id just like to mention to all you lovely people who are worried about their PWD forgetting them

When mum was alive and living in her care home I had a period of about 3 months when OH was having a lot of problems, visits to doctors in London (2 of them for a week of tests so we both stayed there), things happening so that I didnt feel I could leave him, so the long and short of it is that I wasnt able to visit mum at all during this period. When I went back, she had no problem remembering me and obviously had no idea that it was so long since I had previously visited. So, you, see, forgetting is not inevitable.
That's great to know, thanks so much. 😍