Can not follow TV program j

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Kennyboy, Nov 11, 2019.

  1. Kennyboy

    Kennyboy Registered User

    Oct 31, 2019
    50
    we are caring for my sons Nan, she was diagnosed 6 months ago with Alzheimer’s I did not realise until we stayed with her that she can not follow a television programme at all, it’s really hard to sit down in the evening to relax and watch TV because she constantly talks through the programme with the totally wrong end of the stick, I try to read a book on my iPad but she talks at me constantly I have even tried putting head phones on when watching programme on lap top, but again she constantly talks at me and I end up giving up, this means that you get no down time, any suggestions would be gratefully received, I am surprised at this stage that she can not follow tv programmes, she had no hobbies so I’m stuck as to how to keep her amused with something
     
  2. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    My mother prefered programs that you didnt have to follow- nature programs were good, animals etc where there is no story to follow.
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,896
    Kent
    It may sound over simplistic but having a person with dementia at home means the home needs to be dementia person centred.

    The person with dementia at the stage you seem to be describing @Kennyboy has little or no control over their behaviours.

    If your son`s Nan talks through a television programme, it shows she cannot follow the programme or has no interest in it or does not understand you want a bit of peace.

    It might help to have a television in another room so you can watch in peace.
     
  4. silver'lantern

    silver'lantern Registered User

    Apr 23, 2019
    161
    Female
    Possibly watching and listening are to much. It depends where she is at but might she process radio better, or audio books? My PWD tolerates bluetooth headphones, this concentrates the sound and cuts out any other distraction. They are not wired so he can get up an wander around without worry over wires. Will she tolerate being in her own room for this i wonder? That is how (at the moment!) I get some me time. I know this probably wont last, but works at the moment.
     
  5. BryanG2001

    BryanG2001 Registered User

    Mar 2, 2014
    61
    Try some music videos, Mum spent many a happy and quiet hour watching Andre Rieu, as many musicals as I could find, and not at all musical but an occasional Mr Bean.
     
  6. Rob_E

    Rob_E Registered User

    Feb 1, 2015
    171
    Male
    Liverpool
    It was one of the earlier symptoms that we noticed with mum, perhaps over 10 years ago, that she couldn't follow TV programs. She used to love Coronation street, but would repeatedly ask who new characters were and be confused about what was happening. She also loved period dramas so we were very surprised that she had no interest in Downton Abbey for example. Now she has the television on all day but it's really just for background noise.

    It's hard work though, having to explain again and again what's going on, who's who etc.
     
  7. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,653
    south-east London
    When my husband went through this, like others I adapted our tv viewing. Nature and reminiscence programmes went down well as did light-hearted comedy and musical entertainment programmes.

    As for my own viewing, I pre-recorded the films and dramas I was interested in, then I watched them when he was asleep. For the most part I was fortunate in that my husband liked to be in bed by 10pm, which gave me a couple of hours to unwind.

    Once my husband's sleep pattern became irregular, I would catch up on my viewing while he napped in the middle of the day in the armchair (that's if I wasn't trying to catch up on sleep myself!)
     
  8. Kennyboy

    Kennyboy Registered User

    Oct 31, 2019
    50
    Thanks for your reply lynneMcV, the problem is when she goes to bed at 10 we can not stay up much longer because we know she will be up at 4 wanting breakfast, she wakes us up at 4.30 this morning she only has cereal so she could do that herself but she wants us up, I told my hubby to stay in bed no point in both of us being up at that time.
     
  9. Kennyboy

    Kennyboy Registered User

    Oct 31, 2019
    50
    Hi grannie G we could not watch tv in another room as she would just come into that room with us, but thank you for you for your suggestions
     
  10. Champers

    Champers Registered User

    Jan 3, 2019
    189
    It seems to be the same with reading too. My mother used to love her Daily Mail, and actually used to get very annoyed if she didn’t get her newspaper without fail.

    For months now, she seemed to still be able to read out loud but could not comprehend the words. There’s always daily newspapers in the CH and to make conversation today I made small talk about the forthcoming election. She replied that she hadn’t seen anything in the papers about an election!

    Mind you, last Christmas she told me that ‘someone’ must have changed the date of it as it had come out of the blue!
     
  11. DesperateofDevon

    DesperateofDevon Registered User

    Jul 7, 2019
    1,966
    T
    That made me smile
    X
     
  12. rainbowcat

    rainbowcat Registered User

    Oct 14, 2015
    137
    Female
    Funny you should say this! My father has NEVER liked nature or animal programmes, until about a year ago, when suddenly he REALLY enjoyed them. I understand why now!
     
  13. DesperateofDevon

    DesperateofDevon Registered User

    Jul 7, 2019
    1,966
    Monkey world program is a major big hit!
     
  14. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,812
    Female
    South coast
    OH likes travelogues and programs about places - especially of places we have been to.
    Again, no story to follow
     
  15. BryanG2001

    BryanG2001 Registered User

    Mar 2, 2014
    61
    Sleep is a separate problem that needs to be addressed, 6 hours per night is not enough for you or her. I started a thread on the importance of sleep:
    https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/threads/importance-of-sleep-and-of-using-your-brain.118747/
    There are various Fact Sheets on here to help with sleep:
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/symptoms-and-diagnosis/sleep-and-night-time-disturbance
    Then try her Doctor and point out the damage that her lack of sleep is causing.
     

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