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Can NHS Continuing Healthcare be taken away?

IPS

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
3
Hi,
My parents live in South Wales. My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's about 7 years ago. My mum looked after him at home up until about 20 months ago.
After being in a care home for about 4 months, the local authority applied for NHS Contiuning HealthCare (CHC) for my dad. Up until this point (the first 4 months in a care home), the cost had been split between the local authority and ourselves. My dad did qualify, and the costs of his care and care home fees were covered by CHC.
My dad can no longer walk, talk, feed himself. He doesn't know who we are either (or understand questions).
My mum is now no longer able to look after the family home (only worth about £130k) and we are looking into selling it (I am a deputy and trustee from the COP). The family home is held as "Tenants in Common" between my mum and dad.
So, to my question. If we were to sell the family home, my dad would then have a assets of £65k in cash. Would the NHS CHC be taken away from him?
I believe that NHS CHC is based on "needs" and not what his assets are. Is this the case?
Thank you for your responses.
IPS
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
12,756
England
CHC is re assessed on an annual basis and can be taken away. You are correct, assets are not taken into account whilst CHC is in existence. I am sure selling the house would give your Father his share that would only be needed should he loose the CHC funding.
 

IPS

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
3
So, in theory, if my dad's current condition (advanced Alzheimer's) cannot get any better (only deteriorate further), then he shouldn't loose his CHC when re-assessed each year?
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
11,891
London
I'm afraid that's not quite how it works. For example if someone scored a Severe in behaviour because he was violent, and in the care home he becomes placid, then he can be downgraded and lose the funding. I agree that it's an absurd way of doing things, and a managed need is still a need, but you'd have to prove he is no longer violent because he's well looked after and not because his behaviour has changed because of his condition.
 

IPS

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
3
Sounds like I'll just have to wait and see what the result of the re-assessment is each year! Would be nice not to be kept in limbo (CHC system keeping it's options open)!

Thank you for your comments up to now --- all comments welcome!