can my dad travel to australia?

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by juliecowpey, Feb 20, 2008.

  1. juliecowpey

    juliecowpey Registered User

    Feb 20, 2008
    1
    i would like to ask a question about travelling with a relative with Alzheimers. My 79 yr old father was diagnosed with Alzheimers in the UK 7 years ago and it is moderate in nature.He is otherwise fit and well.He receives reminyl (galantamine)8mg twice a day for it. mum looks after him and the house. he has very poor short term memory loss and has to be reminded with cleanliness and diet(or he would eat all day long having forgotten he had just eaten).He goes for a walk every day alone and always finds his way home.he knows all family names but forgets where we all live (i.e that I am in AUstralia). I would dearly love my father and mother to come and visit me but am concerned that the flight, and disorientation of being in a completely different place for over a month might ultimately speed up his deterioration.i have taken them on holiday in the Uk several times for a few days which seemed okay and dad really enjoyed it, but this would be a longer time to be out of normal routine. any advice or comment on this matter would be appreciated.
    yours julie
     
  2. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Julie, welcome to TP.

    Your dad sounds to be at about the stage my husband was three years ago, when I took him to New Zealand for a month. He coped very well, and the long flight disturbed me more than it did him. I had to be with him 24/7, but that was no problem, no different from normal.

    However, I would suggest that your mum talks to your dad's consultant about if first. And the second problem might be insurance. I got cover for John, excluding his dementia, but he was younger than your dad. You might have a difficulty finding cover, given his age and condition.
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,559
    Kent
    Hello Julie.

    I took my husband to India two years ago. He was OK on the journey, we went business class, but when we arrived, even though it is the country of his birth, he didn`t understand where we were and was amazed that everyone spoke Hindi.

    I don`t imagine the travel will have the same affect on your father, going from one English speaking country to another, but the environment will be strange and there will be no recognizable landmarks.

    The biggest problem, I think, will be Travel Insurance. Since our last holiday in the Canary Isles in March 2007, the criteria for medical conditions seem to have changed. My husband cannot get travel insurance now, and he was diagnosed in 2005.
     
  4. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hello Julie, I sound like a parrot, but every person is an indivdual, there is no 'one size fits all'

    There is a lady in Lionel's care home, in her 70's, who after having been in the home a couple of months went to Australia for a holiday with her daughters.

    I don't know how the holiday went, but do know she was fine on her return and settled back into the routine of the home.....
    with all the usual questions, i.e. when am I going home, do I know you etc.

    That was xmas 2006........she certainly could not leave the home now even for a day.

    Only you know your dad. Personally we never had any problems with insurance. We always had annual policies and I declared his illness as it was diagnosed. We travelled for a few years after diagnosis.

    As I say, everyone is an individual.
     
  5. Jodie Lucas

    Jodie Lucas Registered User

    Dec 3, 2005
    57
    Eastbourne
    Hi there,

    I am taking my grandmother who has vascular dementia away for a few days (though only in the UK). I have heard that Age Concren are quite good when it comes to travel insurance.

    Jodie
     
  6. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #6 Margarita, Feb 20, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2008
    My mother flow with me to Gibraltar and back . 2 hour flights in 05 and 06 , her medication was working Ok for her then , so doctor said it was OK to take her on one . she was fine , only like Hazel I found I had to do that also


    The 2nd time around when she flow with me in 06 , only difference was that she was very scared of falling even when she was put in a lift in wheelchair to take her on to the airplane, she shake like a leaf, trying so hard not to scream .

    so after that she said to me " I should never get on an airplanes again should I ? I said No

    Such a shame really as I have been flying with her in airplanes , since I can remember from of the age of around 8 years old .
     
  7. gigi

    gigi Registered User

    Nov 16, 2007
    7,788
    East Midlands
    Hello Julie,

    I've pondered this question for the last year as my husband's daughters are both in Australia.

    I can't comment on Travel Insurance as never got that far!!

    I think you should discuss it with the consultant as no two AD sufferers are alike. My husband's consultant thought we'd left it too late to do that sort of journey..as you say disorientation etc...but your dad may take it in his stride.

    It's very difficult at the stage your dad's at..and also knowing that the longer you leave it..(as I did while I dithered ..:eek:) the less chance you will have of getting him out to see you.

    Please let us know how you get on..

    Love Gigi x
     
  8. Heather Fisher

    Heather Fisher Registered User

    Feb 23, 2008
    2
    Travel Insurance - Exclsions

    My father has both Alzheimer's and vascular dimentia. I am attempting to renew his Annual European Policy as I live in France and my parents vist us as well as doing many other trips.
    What do they mean by excluding my fathers conditions. For example if he had his wallet pick pocketed or put his camera down somewhere but could not remember when he last saw it, would this not be accepted as a claim. They recently lost their tickets.
    Does anyone know exactly what they mean? The insurance company I have spoken to don't seem to understand their own policy exclusions?
     
  9. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,559
    Kent
    `Excluding your father`s condition`, I would interpret as being unable to make a claim for anything that is AD related, and that will mean almost everything. :(
     
  10. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Yes, I'm afraid that's right. I suppose pick-pocketed might be accepted as a claim, because it happens so often in cities these days.

    Losing something -- camera, tickets, etc, I suspect they'd say was down to his condition, and refuse to pay.

    But much more serious would be an accident. Suppose he was knocked down crossing the road. They could say that was his condition too, and he was not safe to be out. And that could be very expensive.

    I'm afraid they've got us all ends up on that one. If they can find a way out of paying, they will.
     
  11. BeverleyY

    BeverleyY Registered User

    Jan 29, 2008
    716
    Ashford, Kent
    We're taking Dad away in the Summer.

    It seems to be the only new thing that he keeps remembering at the moment.

    We're taking him to Italy as he was stationed there for 3 years in the army and can speak fluent Italian.

    He's really looking forward to it, and asks me nearly every day.

    We are going to drive instead of fly, as we think with him and kids lots of stops might help.

    I'd say go to Australia - there will come a point where you can't take your Dad, so enjoy the ability to take him whilst you can.

    Beverley x
     
  12. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,559
    Kent
    Sorry Beverley, but however tempting it is, it is not responsible.

    If there was an accident or need for hospitalization, or even emergency repatriation, it would cost a fortune and wouldn`t be covered by insurance.

    I would also be very careful of attempting overland car travel, in addition to a ferry crossing, in the company of young children, for someone with AD. :eek:

    But you know your father better than I do. :)

    Love xx
     
  13. BeverleyY

    BeverleyY Registered User

    Jan 29, 2008
    716
    Ashford, Kent
     
  14. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,559
    Kent
    Good for you Beverley. I hope you get the answer you want. :)

    Love xx
     
  15. Heather Fisher

    Heather Fisher Registered User

    Feb 23, 2008
    2
    Exclusions

    Thanks to all to reponding, it is as I thought, I didn't want to dwell on anything more than monetery loss but its brought true reality home.
    I guess a relative with this condition is like a young child that you fear not to let out of your site.
    My father however despite being in moderate stages along with the vascular desease believes that he is well and the medical profession have got it all wrong (its one area that his memory does not fail him!)and they are just there to stop him doing what he wants. So far be it for me to stop him, I must find the best solution for him to do what he wishes!!
    Thanks again, its the first time I have visited this forum and it is wonderful to find a non clincal response. I am sure I will be asking further questions as time goes by.
    Best wishes to all.
     
  16. gigi

    gigi Registered User

    Nov 16, 2007
    7,788
    East Midlands
    #16 gigi, Feb 23, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2008
    Hello!

    That sounds just like my husband....!

    Particularly when he gets onto the subject of not being able to drive..it's all the doctor's fault..and because he can't drive he can't play golf!!!:confused:...(So we do try to avoid these subjects!!)

    Love Gigi x
     
  17. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    Dear Julie,

    As another Aussie, I would suggest you talk to Medicare and ask about reciprocal arrangements regarding hospitalisation, medical treatment, even repatriation to the UK. It is quite likely that Australia and the UK have reciprocal arrangements in this area. I know I visited the doctor in the UK in the nineties at no cost to myself because there were arrangemnents in place for Aussies to do this. However, I do NOT know the extent of these arrangements - or even if they still exist.

    You could also contact the Australian Foreign Affairs Dept. to establish what arrangements exist for such events.

    However, if it comes down to such things as theft or lost luggage, I would expect the travel insurance to NOT pay up, especially if they have added an "exception" clause for AD.

    As others have said, I would be careful about having your Dad travel as it is a bit of a mine field, in a number of areas. Could you use the money to visit your parents instead? I daresay that YOU are the main reason for the visit, so perhaps much can be achieved by you visiting them instead . . . . . ???

    Good Luck with the decision, whichever way you go.
     

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