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Can anyone explain the process for appealagainst D/L

Saljabee

Registered User
Nov 27, 2013
2
0
Hi everyone, I am new to this and would appreciate any help from you. My Dad aged 74 has recently been diagnosed with mild vascular demantia. He has had to inform DVLA, who after their investigations have written to him to say that his current licence has been withdrawn and a new photo card d/l will be issued, which is valid for 1 year. My Dad is still very able and a safe drive. He feels very upset that he will have to renew his licence annually and that this may also increase his car insurance. He is generally feeling very low about his diagnose and this decision by DVLA has made him worse. I have tried to explain to him that DVLA need to monitor his driving ability annually for his and other road users safety. But he feels that he should appeal, he doesn't thing his conditon is effecting his driving. Has anyone else appealed and do you know what is involved and whether it is worth doing to help my Dad understand and reduce his tension. :confused:
 

Noorza

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
6,542
0
From reading many posts on here on the driving issue and not being able to tell how the disease will progress, it is better that the DVLA do assess him annually, so I would not encourage an appeal but give loads of reassurance that he'll be fine when he is assessed next year and to enjoy the next year's driving.

He could be able to drive for many years to come or he could become a danger to himself and other road users, it has to be monitored. Many people have agonised about whether to report their partners/parents to the DVLA, as it will remove their independence. Blame the DVLA for being over cautious, support him against the dreadful DVLA, but don't appeal it. Be supportive so far as your Dad is concerned, but distract him from appealing. In 12 months he may be fine to drive in which case he'll be given another 12 months, or you may be so grateful for that assessment.
 

JigJog

Registered User
Nov 6, 2013
236
0
What a brilliant explanation Noorza.

Thank you so much. Your posting has been a great help to me too.

JJx
 

Noorza

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
6,542
0
What a brilliant explanation Noorza.

Thank you so much. Your posting has been a great help to me too.

JJx

I've had a rough day with mum's deteriorating health and your reply has made me smile for the first time today. Thank you.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
25,446
0
North Manchester
"...He feels very upset that he will have to renew his licence annually and that this may also increase his car insurance..."

How would the insurers know? He can still say he has held a licence since <date he passed test> which is all insurers ask.

He already had to renew it at ages 70 and 73 for a 3 year licence and would have had to renew it again at age 76 for another 3 years.
 

Noorza

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
6,542
0
"...He feels very upset that he will have to renew his licence annually and that this may also increase his car insurance..."

How would the insurers know? He can still say he has held a licence since <date he passed test> which is all insurers ask.

He already had to renew it at ages 70 and 73 for a 3 year licence and would have had to renew it again at age 76 for another 3 years.

If there was an accident, and he withheld information that the DVLA were monitoring his driving ability due to the dementia, they may use this not to cover any accidents or injuries. As a previous victim of an uninsured driver, I would suggest letting the insurance company know as this is directly relevant to his potential risk as a driver and let the insurance company decide what to do about it.

There is a clause in insurance policies, please forgive me, I don't have the energy to quote it right now, that if your medical circumstances change where it could affect your driving you have to let them know or the policy could be voided.

I was not insured to drive for 6 weeks after surgery as the consultant told me not to drive, I couldn't or it would be tantamount to driving without insurance, even though I had a valid policy. If there are driving restrictions in place it is always better to inform the insurance company in advance. This is my understanding while by no means being an expert.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
15,115
0
South Staffordshire
As soon as my husband was diagnosed we notified the DVLA and my husband's licence was revoked and replaced with an annual one. He drove for another 4 years before they would not renew and by then he knew himself that driving was becoming a problem. Still difficult for him to accept but the loss of his licence was not blamed on me and really he was not enjoying driving and it was taking a long time to get from A to B when he never got out of 2nd gear.

If they have given him a 12 month licence then there is little point in appealing because he has been given a licence. Best to appeal when they decide they will not renew and by then he may decide himself that driving is too much.


Jay.


Sent from my iPad using Talking Point mobile app
 
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Spamar

Registered User
Oct 5, 2013
7,727
0
Suffolk
My OHs driving licence was revoked as soon as we notified the DVLA after he was diagnosed. We were both extremely annoyed as his driving was fine. I'll say nothing about his sense of direction! He went to one of the assessment centres and was eventually told that he didn't have the strength in his leg to operate the pedals!!!this is on a simulator, by the way, not his own vehicle. Two months later, he certainly wasn't fit to drive, his condition has deteriorated so much (I reckon because of the stress). He accepted, with bad grace, he couldn't drive. I wasn't allowed to get rid of his vehicle for another year ( though it was a pick-up and very useful for some things).
 

Noorza

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
6,542
0
I found this;-

Dementia and driving

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from dementia.
You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. If you’re involved in an accident, you may be prosecuted.

https://www.gov.uk/dementia-and-driving

and this

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=144

which says:

A person with a diagnosis of dementia should also immediately inform their car insurance company. If they do not, their policy may become invalid. It is a criminal offence to drive without at least third party cover.

None of it is optional, even with an appeal the insurance company would have to know and as has been said he has been given another 12 months a lot can change in that time, it might not, but it could.
 

FifiMo

Registered User
Feb 10, 2010
4,705
0
Wiltshire
We'll...here's what I would do...I would sit down and help dad write an appeal and I would put it in an envelope and take it but not post it. When he enquiries I would tell him there is a huge backlog of many months. In the meantime I would make sure he is legal wrt insurances etc.

If this stops your dad stressing OT then it is worth it.

Fiona
 

Saljabee

Registered User
Nov 27, 2013
2
0
Thank you Noorza this makes sense, I will encourage Dad to accept the year renewal of his licence.
Thanks to everyone who has commented, all very helpful:)