1. debby13

    debby13 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2007
    41
    Hi all

    Just wondered if anyone had experienced the superbug C Dif. My Dad who has lewy bodies dementia has been in and out of hospital recently with a urine infection. He has detiorated so suddenly its frightening and now looks in is 80s even though he is 74. He can no longer swallow (dont know why), he barely speaks (even less than before) and now is in isolation with this C Dif thing. Mum and I are at loss should we be complaining to the hopsital or doing something. We feel so helpless and poor mum found out about the c dif thing in such an awful way that even the social worker has made contact and agreed to meet her next week to give her some support. I posted a thread a few weeks ago saying that we had not help for SS and then suddenly this SW appears (she wasnt there for us) and has decided to help...thank goodness!.

    Anyway rambling and just looking for as ever anyone elses tips?

    xxxx
     
  2. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    no tips , but have read that other on TP have had experience with C Diff .sure they get back to you soon

    pleased to read that SW finally helping your mother
     
  3. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Dear Debbie

    I'm sorry your dad has c. diff.,it seems so unfair that our loved ones should have this to contend with, on top of all their other suffering.

    As Maggie says, other people have been through this, and seen loved ones recover, but your dad will be weak and vulnerable.

    It's good that you are getting some support from your SW at last.

    I hope all goes well, keep in touch, I'll be thinking of you.

    Love,
     
  4. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    I found out today(been in work for a handover having been of ill),that a resident admitted on Monday from hospital has c diff.Diagnosed on admission.How unfair is that of the nhs not to disclose it on assessment!So now 32 staff and 40 residents are exposed to it!if i had my say the resident would be returned to where they came from,to protect themselves and others.Contain it within the environment it is rife in?so now 71 others are exposed to c diff!for the sake of one.wheres the sense in it?love elainex
     
  5. christine_batch

    christine_batch Registered User

    Jul 31, 2007
    3,388
    Buckinghamshire
    That is absolutely shocking that they have done that the already vunerable people. Once again it goes to show - where are their brains ???
    O.K. Elaine, I will let you work that out for yourself. At present I am so b****y angry. My eldest son who is very ill in Hospital aged 44 was put in a ward with Dementia patients. The Hospital was filthy. So I am on the rant again - what a complete lots of useless people are responsible for our loved ones.
    Take Care and glad you are feel better.
    Loce from Christine
     
  6. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    The C Diff is now starting to spread in the home i work in,Nothing confirmed as yet but the symptoms and may i say the "smell" is indicative of it.Being the weekend thees limited nhs serviceds.i am really concerned and am considering informing the eho.elainex
     
  7. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    The day from hell.The C Diff has been confirmed but only on the admission resident i posted about.staff have to wear gloves,aprons and masks when going into the residents room.i stoped a visitor to the resident today and didn't reveal the CDiff but said they needed protective wear to go into the room.They declined and left.I spoke to my manager when she turned up at 5.30pm and asked if visitors to the CDiff resident had to be "suited and booted" before they entered their room.She said no!So why are staff trying to contain the CD and visitors don't?baffled,discombobulated elaine will speak to head office tomorrow.
    love elainex
     
  8. carol

    carol Registered User

    Jun 24, 2004
    196
    Surrey/Hampshire
    October 2006 my mother in law was diagnosed with c.diff it was in a hospital setting and she was transferred to an isolation room, where she stayed until December, everyone that entered that room had to have aprons and gloves, she was diagnosed twice with c.diff in the hospital, was transferred directly into a nursing home where she was once again diagnosed with c.diff (she had been discharged from hospital with it)she stayed in isolation in her room at the nursing home until well into 2007, we always had to wear aprons and gloves on visiting, she has not had a reoccurence, but we always ensure that she has a probiotic drink every day. Since the c.diff she has not been able to walk unaided, or feed herself, but two days ago she managed to get out of bed and start walking down the corridor holding onto the bars, luckily a nurse was doing the pill trolley round, and saw her. I only hope she doesn't try and walk, I can see another disaster looming when she falls. We are into 9 years of alzheimers, and she doesn't remember that she hasn't walked for over a year.

    Carol
     
  9. gigi

    gigi Registered User

    Nov 16, 2007
    7,788
    East Midlands
    c diff

    Unfortunately C-Diff and MRSA are among us all these days. I work as a practice nurse for a local GP and we have recently been informed that we need need to make our patients aware of this. Over prescribing of antibiotics in the past has led us to this,apparently. That is not to say that antibiotics should not be given to vulnerable people ie: very young/old/people with already chronic diseases. I would urge anyone looking after a loved one with continence problems to ensure careful handwashing/safe disposal of continence pads/maintain good standards of hygiene when preparing food. All health authorities should have an infection control nurse to contact for advice and support. Hope this helps
     
  10. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    Thanks for your advice on this post gigi.i have researched the c diff this weekend.you mentioned the over prescribing of antibiotics,which leave people susceptible to the bug.We have a member of staff who is on permanent antibiotics due to a kidney problem.Is it ok for them to be assisting the resident with c diff?The infection control procedure is ongoing in the home anyway.Is she at any risk at all?

    thanks elainex
     
  11. gigi

    gigi Registered User

    Nov 16, 2007
    7,788
    East Midlands
    c diff

    Hello! I'd say she ought to be cautious as we all should. am not an expert but she should ask her doctor for advice-obviously she will be more susceptible than the rest of us. Gloves/aprons/handwashing/bagging of infected linen-etc will all help to reduce spread of infection. It's still a bit of an unknown and we don't want to panic anyone. Common sense and rigid hygiene are paramount here-and a sense of humour as ever. what times we live in. Florence Nightingale would turn in her grave!!!! Bless you for the job you're doing and keep yourselves safe. Love xxxx
     
  12. Mary11

    Mary11 Registered User

    Nov 25, 2007
    18
    Hi All,

    There is a support site for c-diff www.cdiff-support.co.uk

    Anti-biotics are used to treat a variety of infections in the body. Unfortunately, sometimes an antibiotic that is being used to treat another bacteria also kills off the 'friendly' bacteria in the bowel. If you have been infected with c-diff this allows the bad bacteria (c-diff) to thrive. Symptoms are generally caused by the production of toxins (poisons) in the large bowel. It's effects can range from mild to severe diarrhoea through to severe inflammation of the bowel which can sometimes be life threatening.

    C-diff produces spores which leave the body in an infected persons diarrhoea. These spores can then contaminate the surroundings, such as toilets, bed pans, bed frames, call bells and other equipment but the most common way of transferring the bacteria is on the hands of healthcare workers, patients and visitors. Good hand hygiene is essential in preventing the spread of c-diff. Thorough hand washing with soap and water (not relying solely on alcohol gel as this does not kill the spores) is imperative even after the use of gloves. Environmental cleaning should be carried out using a chlorine containing disinfectant or 1 part chlorine to 10 parts water on suitable surfaces only.

    Relapses occur in upto 30% of patients. The first line of treatment is usually Metronidazole and Vancomycin may be used if a patient suffers a relapse. Some doctors are using probotics alongside the Metro or Vanco to try and re-establish the good bacteria in the gut, in particular Saccharomyces boulardii which is a yeast and cannot be destroyed by the anti-biotics. S. Boulardii cannot be taken by people who have recently had heart surgery or whose immune systems have been compromised so it is always best to consult with the doctor before taking any alternative therapies.

    Hope this helps
    Mary11
     
  13. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hello Mary, Welcome to TP. Thank you for making your first post informative and supportive.

    Look forward to hearing from you again.
     
  14. Mary11

    Mary11 Registered User

    Nov 25, 2007
    18
    Hi Connie and thanks for the welcome. Don't wish to hijack someone's post but think my mum is in the early stages of alzheimer's..hence my browsing your forum.

    Good luck to you all and I think you are all 'troopers' the way you care and cope.

    Best wishes
    Mary11
     

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