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Breakdown of family relationships

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Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
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Well I went for a lovely long walk today purely for the sake of taking some photo's for my photography group. I suppose it could be classed as exercise but I walked through the town and then along by the river (where I took some good piccy's) and then I popped into the supermarket for some things that we needed. None of it necessary but it made me feel better even though I did not speak to another soul.

I would have liked to have been able to sit on a bench to look at the river but sadly they were all taken by like-minded people so I couldn't. Sometimes it is just necessary to take a break for one's own sanity. I took dad down there a few times while he could still manage with his stick and I saw a few other people pushing wheelchairs today which reminded me of dad and I don't think anyone could begrudge them of a bit of sunshine.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
3,137
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Southampton
that sounds nice. just getting outside where you dont feel confined is like freedom. exercise and essential shopping, nothing wrong with that. they are always saying that you need to look after your mental health as well as your physical health. it gives that boost. glad you enjoy it
 

Seaholly

Registered User
Oct 12, 2020
62
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You can exercise in your own home on a treadmill or exercise bike, or even by waving a can of baked beans around in each hand, but that doesn't mean you are banned from walking, running, cycling or doing weight-bearing exercises outdoors.

The law (any law in the UK) will always come back to the test of what is 'fair and reasonable' interpretation and that is still what the 'man on the Clapham Omnibus' would do.

There is nothing whatsoever in the rules that says it is illegal for a person in a wheelchair to leave the house for exercise and nothing that goes into minute detail about what is exercise. The reason for that is that we are expected to apply common sense i.e. what is fair and reasonable of us.

I have no doubt that the Man on the Clapham Omnibus would take his mum out in her wheelchair and let her take some deep breaths and do a few stretches (and he would also be exercising as he'd be pushing!)
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
3,137
0
Southampton
You can exercise in your own home on a treadmill or exercise bike, or even by waving a can of baked beans around in each hand, but that doesn't mean you are banned from walking, running, cycling or doing weight-bearing exercises outdoors.

The law (any law in the UK) will always come back to the test of what is 'fair and reasonable' interpretation and that is still what the 'man on the Clapham Omnibus' would do.

There is nothing whatsoever in the rules that says it is illegal for a person in a wheelchair to leave the house for exercise and nothing that goes into minute detail about what is exercise. The reason for that is that we are expected to apply common sense i.e. what is fair and reasonable of us.

I have no doubt that the Man on the Clapham Omnibus would take his mum out in her wheelchair and let her take some deep breaths and do a few stretches (and he would also be exercising as he'd be pushing!)
people are just getting totally wrapped up in what the law says, like you said@seaholly there has to be a degree of common sense. what they are stopping is people going miles down the coast and exercising in numbers on brighton beach not a person caring for a person in a wheelchair while that person is exercising. they may not be able to leave that person so takes them with them. the person in the wheelchair could do armchair aerobics. im sure CCTV wont track them to make sure.
 

Quizbunny

Registered User
Nov 20, 2011
136
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To my knowledge there has not been one incidence of a wheelchair user’s right to be outside questioned by either the police or indeed anyone else. This is of course because it would be ludicrous to do so.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
1,347
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High Peak
You can exercise in your own home on a treadmill or exercise bike, or even by waving a can of baked beans around in each hand, but that doesn't mean you are banned from walking, running, cycling or doing weight-bearing exercises outdoors.

The law (any law in the UK) will always come back to the test of what is 'fair and reasonable' interpretation and that is still what the 'man on the Clapham Omnibus' would do.

There is nothing whatsoever in the rules that says it is illegal for a person in a wheelchair to leave the house for exercise and nothing that goes into minute detail about what is exercise. The reason for that is that we are expected to apply common sense i.e. what is fair and reasonable of us.

I have no doubt that the Man on the Clapham Omnibus would take his mum out in her wheelchair and let her take some deep breaths and do a few stretches (and he would also be exercising as he'd be pushing!)
Well said.

No one actually needs to go outside for exercise, it could all be done indoors. So to say wheelchair users can't go for a push in the park 'because that would be leisure, not exercise' would be outright discrimination and that would definitely be unlawful. It's also pretty offensive to wheelchair users to suggest that when they are out they are not exercising.

Wheelchair users are not some amorphous mass of identical people - each is an individual with different abilities. Being in a wheelchair does not mean you are paralyzed from the eyebrows downwards. And even if you were, surely being outside stimulates the mind and increases wellbeing, which is the point of going outside for exercise, isn't it? A daily constitutional....
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
3,137
0
Southampton
Well said.

No one actually needs to go outside for exercise, it could all be done indoors. So to say wheelchair users can't go for a push in the park 'because that would be leisure, not exercise' would be outright discrimination and that would definitely be unlawful. It's also pretty offensive to wheelchair users to suggest that when they are out they are not exercising.

Wheelchair users are not some amorphous mass of identical people - each is an individual with different abilities. Being in a wheelchair does not mean you are paralyzed from the eyebrows downwards. And even if you were, surely being outside stimulates the mind and increases wellbeing, which is the point of going outside for exercise, isn't it? A daily constitutional....
i agree although i dont express myself very well thats what i was trying to say
 

Quizbunny

Registered User
Nov 20, 2011
136
0
You can exercise in your own home on a treadmill or exercise bike, or even by waving a can of baked beans around in each hand, but that doesn't mean you are banned from walking, running, cycling or doing weight-bearing exercises outdoors.

The law (any law in the UK) will always come back to the test of what is 'fair and reasonable' interpretation and that is still what the 'man on the Clapham Omnibus' would do.

There is nothing whatsoever in the rules that says it is illegal for a person in a wheelchair to leave the house for exercise and nothing that goes into minute detail about what is exercise. The reason for that is that we are expected to apply common sense i.e. what is fair and reasonable of us.

I have no doubt that the Man on the Clapham Omnibus would take his mum out in her wheelchair and let her take some deep breaths and do a few stretches (and he would also be exercising as he'd be pushing!)
Hear Hear
 
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