1. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    I can see the benefit to the skin of carers and care workers in that they will probably end up having to wash their hands less. But in terms of infection/hygiene risks aren't they pretty much the same with gloves or hands? Unless the person caring either changes their gloves or washes their hands between each touch of areas of the body, incontinence pads/pants, clothes and bedding (and who does that?) the same risks apply surely?
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,647
    Kent
  3. susy

    susy Registered User

    Jul 29, 2013
    806
    North East
    Nurses and carers are trained to use gloves for most if not all bodily contact these days. Apparently it's an infection control thing. Personally as long as the skin of the carer is intact with no breaks or abrasions it's far easier to keep clean by washing hands rather than wearing gloves. Keeping the skin moisturised with hand cream also helps to keep the skin intact Gloves are fine if something is really contaminated. (I guess I'm old fashioned!) I was taught not to use gloves unless things were really bad.
     
  4. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,274
    Male
    North Manchester
    I tend to agree with you but carers have the additional problems of becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis or passing it on to the next person.

    Taking gloves of without touching the outside surface with bare skin is an art in itself, I saw a nurse in ITU remove an apron and both gloves without touching any of the possibly contaminated surfaces and ending up with one glove and the apron inside the other glove with what had been the inside of that glove on the outside.
     
  5. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,647
    Kent
    It`s easy to peel a glove off holding just the uncontaminated edge. It is then inside out when binned.
     
  6. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,481
    Female
    London
    I never use gloves. I just can't be bothered... :eek:
     
  7. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,078
    North Bucks
    Hello Stanley
    During the later stages of my wife's struggle with AD , we were plagued with the problem of incontinence ( bowel and bladder )
    in all that time I used disposable Latex powder free examination gloves ( don't use synthetic gloves they are cheaper but they are useless for this purpose )
    Latex gloves are readily available and are usually sold in boxes of 100 ( cost varied
    usually £ 5-8 box of 100)

    I never thought I could get used to this terrible task ,but much to my surprise I got to the stage where as long as I had my 'rubber gloves' I felt capable of anything
    I also used these gloves for other personal and domestic purposes
    I was perhaps lucky , but I was confident in the use of these disposable Latex gloves
    jimbo
     
  8. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    I used gloves when I initially had to deal with cleaning up, in 2010/11, but soon stopped after questioning the need for them on the grounds I've explained. I can understand why people would want to use them and, of course, I respect their preference.
     
  9. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,287
    Cotswolds
    I always thought that the main reasons care workers wore gloves were firstly to protect themselves from infection, and secondly to prevent cross-contamination to other clients.

    So as long as family carers wash their hands carefully, and are only working with one person, there is no requirement to wear gloves. I understood that for us, therefore, it's a matter of personal choice? Also it might be thought that aprons are more important, as it's easier to wash your hands than everything you're wearing......

    Lindy xx
     
  10. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    Totally agree with you Lindy, home hygiene and hospital/care hygiene are different in that respect. If you know your caree has a bug and diarrhoea for eg. then donning gloves for the duration would seem sensible but not for daily routine care in my view. The less 'clinical' the home environment appears the better.

    I am old fashioned too and prefer soap and water, we also were not allowed to wear our uniforms in public without a coat on, one reason being keeping our uniform as clean as possible.
     
  11. Lindy50

    Lindy50 Registered User

    Dec 11, 2013
    5,287
    Cotswolds
    Thanks Sue, it's good to know I haven't completely lost the plot! :cool: :) xx
     
  12. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    Its never been you that's lost the plot Lindyxx:);) its the others!
     
  13. bemused1

    bemused1 Registered User

    Mar 4, 2012
    3,403
    Sad as I am I do change my gloves pretty much that often Stanley.
    But I have to admit it's ott and a throw back to my working days when I was involved heavily in cell culture. It gave me a lifetimes obsession I'm afraid.
     
  14. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,647
    Kent
    I think we can all be allowed our differences.

    I find it much easier for there to be a barrier between what my skin comes into contact with when what I touch is unpleasant. It's not only a hygiene issue, it's a tactile issue too.

    I became used to wearing disposable gloves when handling food when I had a skin condition . It's second nature now.
     
  15. jimbo 111

    jimbo 111 Registered User

    Jan 23, 2009
    5,078
    North Bucks
     

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