1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

Being overweight reduces dementia risk.

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by nitram, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
  2. Ladybird23

    Ladybird23 Registered User

    Feb 28, 2014
    130
    Oh goody! I can eat that MCd's burger!!! :D
     
  3. LYN T

    LYN T Registered User

    Aug 30, 2012
    6,968
    Brixham Devon
    Ha! So all those previous reports about keeping your weight under control to avoid Dementia were wrong?:(:confused: Bring on the chocolate:)
     
  4. BR_ANA

    BR_ANA Registered User

    Jun 27, 2012
    1,084
    Brazil
    Great news. I won't need help to eat all Easter chocolate.
     
  5. clareglen

    clareglen Registered User

    Jul 9, 2013
    325
    Cumbria
    I knew this really. My mum has always been underweight & now on end of life care. All the other ladies with dementia in her room are skin & bone too.
     
  6. Oxy

    Oxy Registered User

    Jul 19, 2014
    957
    Quite incensed at this new announcement on news this morning. What about vascular dementia which is caused by clogging of arteries. Whilst being fully aware that weight does not always have a bearing on the state of arteries, atherosclerosis is predominantly present to a greater extent in obese folk. I felt what a sweeping statement that will not help prevent cardiovascular disease which precedes vascular dementia.
     
  7. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,990
    Cotswolds
    Now will NICE allow doctors to prescribe chocolate ?
     
  8. Dustycat

    Dustycat Registered User

    Jul 14, 2014
    220
    North East
    I think all these studies are very interesting and will hopefully eventually lead us to a cure but, having had both parents with dementia, who were both active, normal weight, no other health problems and kept an active mind, I believe it's a lottery. If I had lined up 1000 people in a room 10 years ago I wouldn't have picked out my parents as the ones to get dementia. X
     
  9. marsaday

    marsaday Registered User

    Mar 2, 2012
    541
    I wonder is it because those who are overweight tend to die of other illnesses first before they get dementia? There has always been a link between thinness and longevity. They just live longer and therefore are more at risk.
     
  10. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...I wonder is it because those who are overweight tend to die of other illnesses first before they get dementia?..."


    This was factored into the study.

    "These patterns persisted throughout two decades of follow-up, after adjustment for potential confounders and allowance for the J-shape association of BMI with mortality."
     
  11. lexy

    lexy Registered User

    Nov 24, 2013
    565
    #11 lexy, Apr 11, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2015
    deleted
     
  12. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...Being overweight is not good for your health..."

    The study did not say that being overweight was good for your health.

    It said that being underweight carried an increased risk of dementia.

    These are two entirely different statements.

    Studies like this may ultimately lead to a better understanding of the reasons why some people are affected by dementia.
     
  13. lexy

    lexy Registered User

    Nov 24, 2013
    565
    #13 lexy, Apr 11, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2015
    deleted
     
  14. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...This thread has tended to imply that if you are overweight you have less risk of getting dementia..."

    Which was the interpretation of the study.

    Whether or not being overweight is good or bad for your general health is irrelevant.
     
  15. lexy

    lexy Registered User

    Nov 24, 2013
    565
    #15 lexy, Apr 11, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2015
    deleted
     
  16. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,584
    Kent
    This is a discussion showing the different interpretations people have of the topic. It does not need to become personal.
     
  17. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,783
    Salford
    My mother weighed less than she ever had in the time I knew her when she was diagnosed, part of the reason for my concern about her health was her weight loss, hence I took her to the doctors at which time I expressed concerns about her memory issues and the tests started and it lead to a diagnosis of AZ.
    Likewise years later with my wife she went down from a dress size 12-14 (and a couple of size 16's in the wardrobe too (don't tell her I told you that bit) and eventually when we got it through to the doctors something was wrong and to stop fobbing it of as "women of a certain age" issues she weighed in at 6st 4lb.
    Unless they've considered whole life average weight and not just at the time of diagnosis then it would be a bit meaningless, maybe they did I can't see anything either way.
    Until someone explains the science then all it is at the moment is a coincidence and as I've said before coincidence doesn't prove causality. Italians eat a lot of pasta, Italy has a problem with organised crime, therefore eating pasta caused organised crime.
    Based on my own observations (so totally none scientific) I would say those in the lighter end of the weight scale do seem to be the vast majority of those I see with AZ and there is a noticeable lack of the very overweight compared to the general demographic, but maybe they have mobility issues so don't go to the day centres.
    K
     
  18. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
  19. Jenn

    Jenn Registered User

    Feb 24, 2009
    50
    Leeds
    Being someone who has always been naturally underweight this is sick news to me....However the fact you always see thin people with Alzheimer's means nothing, as the disease itself makes you lose weight, though no doubt the study allowed for this.
     
  20. marsaday

    marsaday Registered User

    Mar 2, 2012
    541
    Point taken. I hadn't read the full study.
     

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