Becoming an advocate

tcarthy

Registered User
Jun 27, 2003
11
Ireland
Could anyone advise some reading material for me - I'm trying to look into the possibility of becoming an advocate for my mother who has alzheimers.


Thanks
 

Angela

Registered User
May 28, 2003
151
Wales
Hi Theresa
Im not sure that you can become an advocate for a family member? Basically an advocate is someone who speaks on behalf of another and usually is independant.
With respect, and I am speaking independantly and from personal experience, obviously we only want what is in the best interest for the person for whom we care, but when our own ... feelings, ideas, recomendations are questioned by another person who thinks that they too have the dementia sufferers best interests at heart, who is to say that if we were to advocate for our loved one, we may not be truley representing what the dementia sufferer wants. Does that make sense? Im welsh you know!
I have tried to be my Mothers advocate unsuccessfully for this very reason, although I have not looked into the legalities of it.

I will try to get some further info for us.
 

tcarthy

Registered User
Jun 27, 2003
11
Ireland
Advocate

Thanks for your reply Angela - sorry I didn't reply before now. I understand what you are saying about a family member becoming an advocate & I wish that I didn't feel that I had another option. If I was getting the information from social services that I was promised, I wouldn't feel that I had to try this route. My mum did sign a letter stating that I should be given all access to information regarding her situation, but despite mailing them I have only received one photocopy of an update report - which was basic to say the least. I am in contact with a legal representative to try & find out what else I can do, so I'll see how that goes.

Thanks for your help
Theresa
 

PeterG

Registered User
Oct 17, 2003
25
Hertfordshire, UK
Not sure if this is exactly the same thing, I'm in the UK, but I did get Jen to sign an Enduring Power of Attorney which gives me the right to sign legal documents on her behalf. The document has to be completed with a solicitor, & the "patient" has to convince the solicitor they understand what it is they are signing.

Hope this helps, best wishes to you
 

tcarthy

Registered User
Jun 27, 2003
11
Ireland
Advocate

Thank you for that Peter - most helpful

Theresa

P.S. I'll post a general reply to let everyone know how I got on - it may help someone else
TC
 

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