1. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Article in today's Daily Mail:

    Doctors now have to ask only two simple questions in order to diagnose depression. The questions are:

    1. During the past month have you been bothered by feeling down, depressed or hopeless?
    2. During the past month have you been bothered by having little interest or pleasure in doing things?

    Could any of us answer no?



    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...ain.html?in_article_id=450305&in_page_id=1774
     
  2. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    that should boost the revenue of those impoverished pharmaceutical companies then :rolleyes:
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    I don't think GP's are any happier about it. There's a blog written by a gp (http://nhsblogdoc.blogspot.com/) which is a real eye opener from the other side of the fence.

    Jennifer
     
  4. Áine

    Áine Registered User

    neither are the practice counsellors :eek: ..... waving from under pile of referrals ...
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    According to the article, GPs are supposed to offer 'talking therapy' first to patients suffering mild to moderate depression.

    According to SANE, only 2% of patients were having behavioural therapy, while 80% were on medication.

    Pharmaceutical shares, anyone?
     
  6. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    The trouble is, many PCT's no longer have anyone available to offer "talk therapy", so often the option is either meds or nothing. Even if it is available, we're talking several months for an appointment I think: much too long for a truly depressed person.
     
  7. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    When I was on the verge of breakdown 2 1/2 years ago I was offered 'talk therapy' and got an appointment immediately. So I suppose like everything else it's a post-code lottery.
     
  8. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,584
    Kent
    I think we need to define the difference between, being really fed up, finding life difficult, and depression.

    Today I am fed up. My husband is having one of his `my life is like living in a concentration camp` days, and it`s really difficult to live with.

    I know he`ll be over it by tomorrow, or the next day, and I`ll feel better.

    I would answer `Yes` to both questions posed by the Daily Mail, but do not consider myself depressed. To my mind, depression is when you need either drug or counselling therapy to lift your spirits.
     
  9. Natashalou

    Natashalou Registered User

    Mar 22, 2007
    426
    london
    I agree


    I think I would only define myself as really depressed if I could find nothing at all to look forward to or be cheerful about in the future. Of course, I am not a 24/7 carer like so many of you , but I get very unhappy about my mum and guilty about her unhappiness, I get fed up with my older son who wont get a job and I worry about the younger one who smokes and happily got some idiot to tattoo him!!
    But I am very lucky in that they are both happy loving boys, i have a nice (non resident) partner who God forgive him thinks I am sweet who buys me flowers and takes me out.
    I am reasonable healthy apart from hypertension, i have enough money to live on and a house and car.
    So really I have so much I only need to count my blessings and I am happier again
     
  10. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    I absolutely would agree that being sad because of a life circumstance is not the same as being depressed in a clinical sense. It's a bit facile, and this is just personal experience, but when I'm clinically depressed (as opposed to down) I can count all my blessings, and not find comfort in any of them. That's actually how I know I'm spiralling down. I'm sad about my mother's situation, but that's not depression per se, that's being sad.

    Jennifer
     
  11. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    I absolutely agree. That's why the two questions are so pointless. They make no effort to differentiate.
     
  12. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    I had a letter from our GP practice asking a whole list of questions about depression.
    Do feel useless?
    Do you feel like harming yourself?
    Do you feel there is no point in life?
    Nmany many more.
    I put one big yes and asked wouldn't you be depressed after being a carer for over 11 years to a dementia patient?
    I did not receive an answer.
    Norman
     
  13. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,584
    Kent
    Hi Norman, 11 years is a long time. Stating the obvious I know, but I`m thinking how I am after 2 years and dread to think how I`ll be in another 9.
     
  14. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Am I depressed...................YES, YES, YES

    But you learn to pick yourself up, and just caryy on with life.
    Our Norman is my example. If I can follow in his footsteps, so be it.
     
  15. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland

    Mine too. And so is Connie. God bless you both,
     
  16. alfjess

    alfjess Registered User

    Jul 10, 2006
    1,213
    south lanarkshire
    Hi All

    I could answer yes definately to both of the above questions, but I have never been depressed, at least not that I know of. I have never been treated for depression, so how do I know, if I am depressed?

    I know that recently everything has become an effort, no energy and am not eating like I should.

    I don't want to go out, don't want people visiting.

    When I think of the next thing I have to deal with for Mum and Dad, I aware of my heart beating, as though it is thumping, indeed I think daily, I have to get to the Doctors and have a check up, but don't do it.

    Is this depression? I don't feel depressed

    Thanks
    Alfjess
     
  17. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I think you took the words right out of my mouth Jennifer! I think being depressed because of something that has happened is called 'reactive' depression and is a perfectly understandable reaction to things going wrong in your life.

    I think the problem is when you literally can't get out of bed in the morning, despite knowing that there are no major problems in your life at the time. There have been times in my life when everything in the garden is as rosy as can reasonably be expected to be, but I am so weighed down by depression that I am literally in physical pain. Conversely, there have been times when I have had really major problems and yet coped OK and been able to rationalise everything. The really scary times are when I have been clinically depressed AND major things are going wrong in my life. Not a good place to be! :eek:
     
  18. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,584
    Kent
    Hi Alfjess, Not being a doctor, I shouldn`t say, but you don`t sound depressed, you sound anxious and tense and stressed out and worried, but not depressed.
     
  19. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Well I think you took the words out of mine, Brenda! That's an exact description of how I feel when I'm depressed (am I using your brain, or are you using mine?) :D
     
  20. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I would not attempt to make any kind of diagnosis, obviously, but that does sound like you have symptoms similar to those suffered by many people with depression. Also, the heart thumping sounds like anxiety. When you talk about not wanting to go out and not wanting people visiting then that sounds very familiar - I withdraw into my shell when I am depressed.

    It's a good question 'how do I know if I am depressed?' If you saw your GP I would think that he or she would decide on that from the answers to certain questions he would ask you. If you are telling yourself that you need to visit the GP then I think you should try to go ahead and do it. However, another sign of depression can be lethargy, which you also seem to describe! Lethargy can include thinking that it is too much of an effort to make an appointment and see the GP!

    I think it might be worth you trying to make the effort to see your GP. They might just be able to help.

    Take care
     

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