Anyone come across this before

MichelleE

Registered User
Nov 28, 2005
14
60
Bedford UK
Hi all,
Okay I know people with dementure sometime do some things that we question as being odd. But mum has in the past week started putting two hot water bottles in her bed at night. Okay I know we're not having the best of summers but it isn't that cold.

Also she keeps turning te heatin up to 22 decrees on the thermometer. meaning that when I get up in the morning the house is like a sauna.

The heating I can fix my turning off the heating part on the boiler but hot water bottles! Help... Prehaps it's best to just leave her to it.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,144
Kent
Hi Michelle,

My husband changes his clothes 100 times a day, vest on, vest off, jumper on, jumper off, fire on, fire off.........

He gets very hot after any activity, eg going for a walk or vaccing, but otherwise is always cold. It might be because of lack of activity, but it also might be because the body doesn`t function as efficiently as it did.
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
MichelleE said:
Prehaps it's best to just leave her to it.
I think you're right, Michelle. John feels the cold terribly, and the slightest breeze sends him scurrying for his fleece.

I do think the body's thermostat can be affected in AD. Of course, if your mum has lost weight, that would also make her feel the cold.
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
. Prehaps it's best to just leave her to it.
yeah why not , seeing that you can control the boiler .

I have read that people with dementia feel the cold more , my mother always complaining that she cold
 

MichelleE

Registered User
Nov 28, 2005
14
60
Bedford UK
You could well be right

Thinking about it now I'm sure I've heard before that people with AD/Dementure feel the cold more or beleive they do.

The thermostat is remember behavour, I'm sure off that, my fault for sticking a big arrow on where it should be left, D'Oh :D
 

Nebiroth

Registered User
Aug 20, 2006
3,511
Yes. My Dad feels the cold terribly. How much this is due to AD an d how much his very poor circulation, we don't know. He is always saying he feels cold no matter how warmly dressed he is.

It might be worth mam having a checkup to see if there's not some underlying condition that is causing her to feel cold.
 

Kate P

Registered User
Jul 6, 2007
565
Merseyside
This is something we've just experienced with mum. She has the heating on and the fire on and is wrapped up in jumpers and cardigans. The rest of us are keeling over with the heat!!

My dad told her she was not to touch the boiler anymore and she has misunderstood and now keeps turning it off so he's getting a cold wash every morning! Time he installed an electric shower I think!
 

DaisyG

Registered User
Feb 20, 2006
183
North West England
Just like us....

We are having a Summer (again) with the heating on full blast, but thankfully I have not had to get the water bottles out, just yet.
I don't think my husband remembers that we HAVE any.

We also have has the pleasure:rolleyes: of wearing Quilted Ski jacket , scarf AND gloves to our recent out-patient appointment !! What fun !!

Says all the time... "I'm f'ing freezing....." . Nothing it seems can warm him up.


He does not 'feel' cold (how could he), and I sit roasting in the blazing sun.

He feels 'me' as cold, and is ALWAYS asking me to warm my hands up... run them under the hot tap.... or wear gloves.
Say that my hands feel like freezing cold tiny needles.


He HAS to / NEEDS to have someone help him dress (strokes prevent him going this himself), but now he wants me to help him get dressed 'without touching him'. This is IMPOSSIBLE.


IT was the same last Summer too. Heating on all the time, and wearing Winter clothes YEAR round.

Take Care

DaisyG
 

Margarita

Registered User
Feb 17, 2006
10,824
london
DaisyGSounds like your husband doing the right thing , even thought its not that cold outside at the moment

Keeping warm


Becoming cold for any length of time is a serious health risk – particularly for older people or for those who are inactive and have poor circulation. A severe drop in body temperature can cause hypothermia, which can result in loss of consciousness and even death. The person you are caring for may feel the cold far more than you do, but they may not realise it or may be unable to tell you.




Try to make sure that the rooms where the person sits and sleeps during the day are kept warm. Draught proofing and roof insulation will help.
Use layers of clothing, ideally with natural fibres, such as wool.
Encourage the person to wear a hat, gloves and warm socks if they go out in cold weather – and indoors too, if necessary
.
Got that from this link http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/Caring_for_someone_with_dementia/Health/advice_healthy.htm

even thought its not that cold outside at the moment