1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

anybody experianced this?

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by caring a, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. caring a

    caring a Registered User

    Mar 1, 2014
    132
    mum at timesjust starts laughing and acting like a stupid child,,,its so odd,,,,,,she might start clapping for no reason,,if i give her a toffee shell say,,,,,yuuuuuuummmmmmmmmmm,,mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm,,,,toshhheeeeeeeeeee,,,,
    it kinda drives me mad,,,,,but i keep quiet as shes obviosly happy and enjoying them but god so bizare:eek::eek:
    saying today its lovelyy its xmas day,,,,,,,
    certainly is a test for anybodys sanity sitting here,,,,,
    anybody else witness simular,,i guess its just another phase,,
    what a terible illness,,,:(
    love to you all,,xxxx
     
  2. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,990
    Toronto, Canada
    It's probably a phase but at least she's happy. My mother had several long phases of agitation, aggression and physical violence - I would have gladly swapped them for her being childishly happy.

    Listening to it must be draining your patience, though. Hang in there and think "At least she's happy".
     
  3. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    I get this with mum sometimes, I used to think she was being sarcastic when she went over the top with gratitude for just a piece of chocolate, of course she's not, I was just not used to seeing her like this. Back in the day, any gifts she received she would accept with a simple thank you.
     
  4. caring a

    caring a Registered User

    Mar 1, 2014
    132
    hi tin,,yes comes as a bit of a shook when they act this way,,,,but as joanne said at least they are happy i guess,,,,but yes joanne can be quite draining,
     
  5. Perdita

    Perdita Registered User

    Jun 22, 2009
    219
    Suffolk, Uk
    My mum claps as a way of getting my attention which is quite helpful really.

    I have also found her hearty laughing is actually no such thing, it's crying in disguise :(

    I think she has about 6 different personalities living inside her now. I hold my breath when she opens her eyes to see which one it will be.
     
  6. Dennis Brown

    Dennis Brown Registered User

    Jun 11, 2008
    16
    Worcestershire
    Hi, Yes it can be stressful when this happens, my wife Ivy has had Alzheimer's for. 10 years and the changes in her actions have been gradual, losing mobility, arms held in one position, having to feed her continually but you get used to them. Just remember, the lovely Mum you've been brought up by is still there, so stick with it Gal, lov conquers everything, Dennis B.
     
  7. pen61

    pen61 Registered User

    Mar 22, 2015
    11
    Hello well its nice to hear of some thing similar that my aunt does !

    We are responsible for our Aunt and like you we have notice a child like squeal she does when we give her or do something nice she also swings her legs when sitting on a chair like a child I usual laugh with her which is nice as I know it can easily all change I like to think she's acting as if she did when she was a child, carefree and happy ! we have notice her walk has change though from a steady robust pace to an almost shuffle but she thinks she is walking fast. So many changes we just try to make her laugh and enjoy those happy times . Good luck its lovely to know others are feeling the same:)
     

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