1. Linny52

    Linny52 New member

    Aug 9, 2018
    7
    My mum has alzhiemers, she lives at home on her own, she does manage quite well with family support to help keep her on track, but at the moment she isn't taking her tablets properly or eating properly, she mainly lives on porridge and sandwiches although she thinks she has four meals a day. I check her fridge and cupboards and keep track of her medication, but lately she doesn't like me doing this and watches my every move so I can't even help without her realising, does anyone have any ideas how I can help her because she thinks she doesn't need it and there is nothing wrong with her thank you
     
  2. Rollwithflow

    Rollwithflow New member

    May 15, 2019
    4
    Home along may have come to an end...
     
  3. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,387
    @Linny52 you are describing me and my dad a year or so ago. Dad didn't need help either and still doesn't according to him. I ended up doing everything, twice daily visits for medication, breakfast and dinner and also the shopping, washing, housework and so on.

    Dad still doesn't need help and is capable of looking after himself because he is very fit and healthy for his age with no more than a bit of normal forgetfulness that comes with age. In truth he is 89 years old, very frail, has no short term memory to speak of and also has cancer. I am with him 24/7 now and really just waiting for another crisis and then he will go into a care home.

    I think you are going to need a lot more family support because the situation won't improve and I understand your problem in that your mum can't see that there is anything wrong. If you haven't already then now may be the time to get your mum assessed by the Local Authority although your mum may not agree.

    Do something though before you end up in my position.
     
  4. Linny52

    Linny52 New member

    Aug 9, 2018
    7
    Thank you for your replies, it does help to know others have had the same issues. Will think about local authorities maybe someone different to give pills or meals may be more successful thank you again
     
  5. anxious annie

    anxious annie Registered User

    Jan 2, 2019
    69
    Hi Linny52
    It's a difficult one. My mum has Alzheimer's for over 3 years and has been living alone for 2 years since dad died. She already had Poa for finance and health set up when dad, her carer , died so we were able to take over paying bills, getting her cash etc and she was fine about this. She would insist that she did all the shopping, cooking, cleaning , but in reality did none of this so the family had to do weekly shop and laundry (tho she didn't have much as never changed her clothes!) . We also had a meeting with social services and arranged day centre 3 days a week and carers coming in to do an evening meal 4 times a week for half an hour (tho mum always said she didn't need them and could do things herself... she couldn't .... We insisted she kept the carers saying it gave us peace of mind incase she had a fall (she had a fall when dad was alive). It's only within the last couple of months that mum has allowed the carers to do a meal .... this was after a meeting where we insisted the carers heat up a meal, rather than ask mum if she'd like one , as she always said no she'd do it herself, but couldn't work the microwave. I think you will need to get some outside help or you will feel as a family that it eventually gets too much. We are starting to feel that now, even with support. Also you can get benefits such as council tax disregard and Attendance Allowance which helps to pay for care.
     

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