1. Doghouse

    Doghouse Registered User

    Dec 30, 2015
    15
    Folkestone, Kent
    Mum is always anxious. To the point that in the early hours of the morning she called lifeline and they sent the paramedics as she was having trouble breathing. Thankfully it was a panic attack and nothing more serious. She is afraid of everything. Is this a common factor in the early stages?
     
  2. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    I don't know how common it is but it isn't surprising - the world of memory loss is terrifying - suddenly losing reference points like time which affect every area of our lives. The early hours are the worst for most of us as well - all worries surface and grow into giants!!

    However having said that it would be worth having maybe a joint appointment with her at the GP to see if they can recommend some low level meds which would just take the edge off - to be honest something as simple as Kalms we used to use for very anxious periods (and I still do sometimes for me lol) but a GP appointment might be a good idea as there is so much for her to cope with and she is possibly over thinking everything. One day at a time - easy to say but so difficult to keep to.

    Good luck, I'm sure others will have some ideas
     
  3. Amy in the US

    Amy in the US Registered User

    Feb 28, 2015
    4,619
    USA
    I can't give you any hard data about how common this is, but I can tell you that your post describes my mother perfectly in what I now know was early-to-mid stage of her Alzheimer's-type dementia.

    My mother's GP tried various medications and she did get relief with some of them, although this benefit diminished as the dementia worsened and my mother was unable to manage her own medications.

    What cured the anxiety was the move to the care home. My best guess is that relief from responsibility (she was living alone at home with no services or help and not coping at all, despite her protests to the contrary) and relief from trying to "cover up" about not functioning okay, combined with better nutrition, sleep, medication management, and more company, all were what helped with the crippling anxiety.

    A year after the move to the care home, she still sometimes has a small amount of anxiety or distress but can be reassured or distracted. The major anxiety is gone. She is much, much calmer and content.

    I would talk to the GP and see what they could offer, and definitely a medication review is a good idea, if applicable.

    Otherwise, is it possible for her to have more company and social interaction? Carers, a day centre, something like that?
     
  4. Doghouse

    Doghouse Registered User

    Dec 30, 2015
    15
    Folkestone, Kent
    We have been to her GP this evening and he is going to refer us back to the consultant of the mental health team. The GP has stopped the dompezil as he said this could be making the anxiety worse. Mum wants to be told it will all get better when really she knows that it won't. Her world has changed and will continue to do so and I think that is what frightens her.
     
  5. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,731
    I agree Doghouse, it would make me feel the same. I think something to 'take the edge off' would probably put her back into normal functioning range without being doped up but it would make her life better and that's what it's all about really. Glad the GP is so proactive
     
  6. Witzend

    Witzend Registered User

    Aug 29, 2007
    4,289
    SW London
    Horrible, isn't it. In early and mid stages my mother often told me she was worried or frightened, but when I asked what about, she would invariably say, 'I don't know.'

    I told her countless times that there was nothing to worry about, we were taking care of everything for her, but it would reassure her only for the moment.

    I think one of the greatest public misconceptions about dementia is that people are generally 'happy' in their not-knowingness.
     

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