• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can be found in our area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Another failed discharge.

Melles Belles

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
1,000
0
South east
@nae sporran I think you’re right about C being moreconfused in hospital. She will definitely be disoriented and hopefully this will wear off fairly quickly when she gets home. My FIL soon re-orientated once he got home but my dad always seemed to get delirium whenever he was in hospital.
Have they changed C’s medication as that might be contributing to her confusion?
I hope C gets home soon and with the right care package.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
Thanks, @Izzy and thank you, @Melles Belles. Medication has been changed so often in hospital and for a few weeks beforehand, so that porobably is the answer. Good to know your FIL managed to get re-oriented once he got home. Sorry about your dad's delirium, I hope that didn't last long.
 

Helly68

Registered User
Mar 12, 2018
1,106
0
@nae sporran - my Mum's confusion was massively increased by being in hospital, also by anaesthetic. I have been following your and C's posts, and hope that they manage to get things sorted out for her.
With Mummy, it depended on what had happened as to how long it took for her to be less confused. After an emergency operation, it took months for her to physically and mentally recover. After a shorter hospital stay, not as long. Having a routine and familiarity helped - in Mummy's case in a care home.
Wishing you both all the best.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
Thank you, @Helly68. It looks like you and your mum went through a few stressful times.
Getting back into routines is actually becoming harder as C's sleep patterns are a bit muddled some mornings. I hope that old routine of lunch, her cake lady (sitting service carer) on a Tuesday and familiar DVds and CDs will work just as well.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
Well, I got some answers today from the medical doctor. The increase in opiates is not controlling the pain, but is making confusion worse. They think C is focusing too much on the pain and that creates a vicious circle where she will not be able to shake off or overcome the real pain. I have seen her do that sort of thing over trivial conversations about what is in the newspaper or where I had been walking that day, so it made sense.
So, they are now talking to the mental health team about anxiety medication. I don't really want to add any more medication, but what members here report about dementia and anxiety meds it may help. I think some of you may disagree, so any advice welcome. That's just so I know what they are talking about when I next speak to someone on Monday or Tuesday.
The skin is beginning to heal slowly, so that is less of a worry and the OT is going to co-ordinate discharge with social services, community OT and care manager. She seemed genuinely keen after last week, so that's less to worry about.
If they can sort out the anxiety that has come with the pain over the past 5 months or so then I have to accept that as a good result in the circumstances.
 

Melles Belles

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
1,000
0
South east
@nae sporran I suspect it would be better to be on anti anxiety meds than on morphine. When someone has multiple health conditions it’s generally a matter of lesser evils with meds. Hopefully anti anxiety meds will improve her QOL.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
10,988
0
Southampton
my husband has been prescribed sertraline as he was low in mood and he only on a low dose but hes definitely happier and not so much frustration because he cant do what he wants to do.i also think that it helped him go out and meet people at the shed and why he looks forward to it now. it doesnt make him sleepy or confused although you do have to give it a couple of weeks to work. another he has amitrityline which is another but thats low dose as well and they are actually used as painkillers as well.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
Sorry your husband is aggressive, Jennifer. You have been so helpful to me and I never seem to have the time or energy to read your thread.

C was worrying her daughter this morning. E called to say hullo and C seemed to know who she was, but then after saying something like please stay she fell asleep mid sentence. I have seen her fall asleep mid sentence while talking about what's on telly or where I was walking, but that was new and a bit of a worry. The nurse I spoke to said she was back on the anti itching medication, Loratadine I think it's called, and it's probably all those medication changes. No sign of the new anxiety meds, but no doubt those will cause a bit of confusion and sleepiness until they kick in.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
75,850
0
Kent
Loratadine is an anti histamine @nae sporran. It's described as non drowsy and for me, it is.

Whether or not it has a different effect on people with dementia is anyone`s guess.

Could it possibly be why C is falling asleep mid sentence?
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
I think C's dementia symptoms have got worse over the last year and half, and definitely over the past few months. That's down to the itch, 9 UTIs in 10 months and now the pain disrupting sleep. Trying to keep her positive, trying to calm her daughter's fears while always preparing for the possibility that she will go so far downhill is hard work.
Thanks Sylvia.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,463
0
Scotland
Loratidine was totally useless for John when he had itchy skin. He was given the more powerful promethazine which did make him drowsy but had some effect on his itch.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
Loratidine was totally useless for John when he had itchy skin. He was given the more powerful promethazine which did make him drowsy but had some effect on his itch.
Thanks Marion, I'll ask the doctor tomorrow if there is a reason they prefer the Loratadine.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
I completely forgot to ask about tablets for itching. C's daughter is so frustrated that nobody will tell her directly what is happening she is just getting more and more aggressive. She even told C about 4 times in 2 minutes on the phone not to think about the pain. I didn't know whether to laugh or take the phone away.
C does seem to be a bit better, but the doctor does think the morphine combined with the constipation is what has been making her more confused over recent days. That makes some sense from experience. It's just a waiting game while they sort out care plans, changes to meds and finding ways to take her mind off the pain.
It was good to get out this morning with a photo walking group, with another group tomorrow. That helps keep me sane, and I hope I can use that to help C through another hard week. Cheers, everyone.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
C is medically fit for discharge despite no change from yesterday when they were worried about her pain management. The doctor today had never met me or Christel before. She stood arms folded as I asked why the plan had changed. To say I am not happy would be an understatement. She was going to speak to C's daughter and miss me out until I told her who I was. Why is that not on her records.
It will take a couple of days to sort out community OT assessments and care packages so there should be a chance to speak to a competent doctor tomorrow. Sorry, I am scared she won't settle once she is home. I am scared I won't cope with deterioration over the winter. Nobody is listening and her daughter is making life harder by interfering despite only seeing C every week for lunch and not listening to me telling her what happens in between those meetings.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
10,988
0
Southampton
i have a problem with doctors because of the age gap, not sure if you wever had the look when they are trying to work if im his wife, daughter, hes my father? weve been together 33yrs but theres 19yrs between us and you can see they are asking you to help you out. we have fun and leave them floundering for which relationship we are
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
9,100
0
Bristol
There's a wee bit more than that between C and myself @jennifer1967. A couple of friends I knew in my 20s got married just after leaving university and he went a bit grey rather young while she looked pretty young for her age. Someone he knew through voluntary work turned up on the doorstep and when she answered he asked if her father was in. She and most of our mutual friends found it funny, but he was not quite so amused.
It is just frustrating and adds to problems, but good to see you and your husband find the funny side in your difficult situation.