Another Drug?

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
Has anyone come across a drug called Piatin?

Its probably spelt totally wrong - sorry! Aunt was on haliperadol to calm her down but has become increasingly distressed/restless of late and I am told they have introduced ths one in small doses in the morning.

Any feedback welcome please

Kriss
 

Jude

Registered User
Dec 11, 2003
2,287
66
Tully, Qld, Australia
Dear Kriss,

I've not heard of this. Is is something like valium, rather than Aricept or Ebixa?

I'd rather like to find out too, since my father's anxiety state has now reached epic proportions and he is almost becoming unbearable to live with at present.

Jude
 
C

Chesca

Guest
Mine's a large one!! I'll do a little research and see what I can find.

Chesca
 

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
Mmmm sounds quite tasty!

Perhaps it has the same effect - have we been missing something here?

Kriss

(almost certainly spelt wrong)
 
C

Chesca

Guest
Dear Kriss

I think we have been missing something so in the spirit of research have purchased a glass or two and it is quite tasty and fortifying for my researching.

I'm looking through the litany of drugs mum has had over the while, all of them some kind of .....odal or.....apine to see if I can find an answer. It's not olanzapine is it? The nursing staff do have a way of saying things quickly so you don't quite catch it. Ask them to spell it and write it out. Meanwhile, Sherlock is still on the job.

(Just a discreet question: you haven't been on the old piatin from the winery and are seeing anagrams, are you?)
Lots of love for now
Chesca
 

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
ok so it wasn't PIATIN but all the letters are in there somewhere...

Let's try again - has anyone heard of QUETIAPINE?

...and no I wasn't on the wine version!

Kriss
 
C

Chesca

Guest
Now that! I think mum is on that. Will have a check and back to you. Don't put the stopper in the bottle yet, though, Kriss

Chesca
 
C

Chesca

Guest
Kriss

this any good?

SEROQUEL AstraZeneca
Quetiapine

Use:
Antipsychotic agent for the management of the manifestations of schizophrenia. Adults, initially, 25 mg twice daily, titrated with 25-50 mg increments twice daily, as tolerated to a target dose of 300 mg/day given twice daily within 4 to 7 days. Make further dosage increments/decrements of 25-50 mg twice daily if indicated based on individual clinical response and tolerability at intervals of not less than 2 days. Usual effective treatment dose range: 300-600 mg/day. Some patients will require as little as 150 mg/day. Safety of doses> 800 mg/day not evaluated.

Elderly patients: consider a slower dose titration rate and a lower daily therapeutic target dose than that used in younger patients.

Mild hepatic impairment: Initially, 25 mg/day, with daily increments of 25-50 mg to an effective dose, depending on individual clinical response and tolerability.

Seroquel's efficacy in long-term us (i.e. > 6 weeks) has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials.

Precautions:
Neuroleptic malignant syndrome, tardive dyskinesia. Hypotension and syncope, especially during the initial dose titration period. Conduct eye examinations prior to or shortly after starting Seroquel and at 6-month intervals thereafter; discontinue the drug if clinically significant lens changes are observed. History of seizures. Hypothyroidism. Hyperprolactinemia. Antiemetic effect. Suicide. Use with great caution immoderate or severe hepatic impairments. Renal impairment, cardiovascular disease. Disruption of body temperature regulation. Hyperglycemia. Lactation (avoid breast-feeding). Pregnancy: weight expected benefits vs. possible risks. Safety/efficacy in patients < 18 years not established.

Side effects:
Somnolence, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, dyspepsia, postural hypotension, elevated ALT (SGPT) levels, weight gain.

Interactions:
May enhance the effects of other centrally-acting drugs, certain antihypertensive agents; may antagonize the effects of dopamine agonists and levodopa. Increased clearance of Seroquel by phenytoin, barbiturates, rifampin, carbamazepine. Increased concentrations of Seroquel with azole antifungals and macrolide antibiotics.

Patient tips:
Caution re somnolence, dizziness (NB driving). Avoid alcoholic beverages. Eye examinations as scheduled.

Supplied:
25 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg tablets

Now can we get on the drinking the wine? please
Lots of love
Dr Chesca
 

thompsonsom

Registered User
Jul 4, 2004
97
halifax
quetapine

Hi

My mum-in-law has been on this tablet for about 2 months now and I have to say so far (touch wood) it has been a godsend as before she was not sleeping and keeping us all awake but now within half hour of taking 2 on as evening she is dopey and ready for bed. She also takes 1 in the morning which was difficult at first as she was nodding off but now it seems to have settled and she copes o.k. She has now finally been pescribed aricept which we will be starting today, so hope we are as succesful with this tablet. We did notice a change in her when she started taking quetapine and I asked the mental health doc if it could improve memory but he said no probably the difference we were seeing was due to her sleeping better. He also said she was low
in vitamin b12 and needed injections but my mum in laws Gp is useless and I have had to chase him for the last 3 weeks to try and get him to deal with this. When i called in last week and spoke to the receptionist about it she said oh sorry we havent done any filing for 3 weeks and the letter is in the file. When she read it she said it just said she was lacking b12 and didn't actually say it was needed to be given. I would have thought that given my mother has dementia and vitamin b12 affects memory that it would be worth a try. why is it that you always have to wait for things to happen and chase them yourself, my mum in law as gone downhill so quickly this year that if things were speeded up the progression of the illness may have been slowed down somewhat. We are now under the mental health nurse who came to visit last week to see if aricept was an option and she thinks that it is more likely mum has vascular dementia possibly caused by a stroke that has not been diagnosed, she is now arranging for a brain scan to check. The system is pathetic and has such our loved ones suffer and we are to busy caring to be able to fight the authorities as well.

janice
 

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
Quetiapine Update

Aunt is almost into a 3rd week of taking this drug and despite my initial concerns I would have to agree with the staff at her home that she is "better".

Difficult to define "better" as there are pros and cons.

She had become very frustrated and distressed, not resting at all and getting very angry. The matrons concern was that she would bring on something physical as in a stroke or heart attack as she would get very red in the face etc.

Within days of starting a dose in the morning we visited and she was "out for the count". Even when we woke her and steered her to the dining room she seemed as though she was still asleep.

Visitors early this week reported her incontinence was worse and she was very sleepy. My feelings on the incontinence were that she was too asleep to realise she needed to go but talking to the Matron yesterday she explained that many go through this phase and don't actually have accidents but will return to their rooms, and usually a specific place in the room, to urinate. (Not wishing to be sexist here but I've heard the tale of some gentlemen who - having perhaps inbibed a little excess amber nectar - have routinely attempted to use the wardrobe for this purpose) so there is some sort of behavioural pattern maybe!

Anyhow, we visited again yesterday and although she was asleep in a chair when we arrived, she came to really well and we went up to her room where she chatted for nearly half an hour before dozing off. Not fully asleep I' don't think, as I put on her Gilbert & Sullivan CD and occasionally she would start to sing along.

The amazing thing was that her speech was understandable for almost 2/3 of the time. Now I'm told the speech therapist has been and worked with her but my feelings are that because the drug has taken the edge off her tension the words were able to flow more easily.

So it seems that the Quetiapine is a success to date. It isn't going to be a cure but despite my fears of her being doped in order to make everyones life easier I am relieved that as well as having taken away the periods of distress, when she is awake she may be able to communicate a little more.

Kriss
 
C

Chesca

Guest
Dear Kriss

Am happy to know you're mind is a little settled knowing your aunt is calmer. No, sadly the drug won't make her better but it may help alleviate some of the dreadful angst for everybody.

I know it's horrible imagining the chemical cosh being used for the benefits of the staff and I suppose to some extent that may be true. But the better ones will be aware of your concerns and keep you up to date with progress. And if you are not happy about it you may be able to speak to the GP.

Unfortunately, incontinence is a side effect because the reactions are slowed right down. Just make sure that she is changed as often as necessary and don't settle for a 'well we are only allowed to do it four times a day'. I keep my own supply of pads and wipes in Mum's room because I know she would not like to be seen to have lost her dignity, although these days she herself is not very aware of it.

The Gentleman and the Wardrobe? I married him some years ago and left him less years later!

Right! Now that's sorted, let's have a glass of something sparkly, white, alcoholic and out of a green bottle marked Champagne. Thanks be for that bit of good news.

Lots of love
Chesca
 

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