1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241
    Hi,

    I'm just wondering if anyone can give me some advice on my present concerns please.

    OH was diagnosed two years ago at the age of 62 with 'Dementia - probable Alzheimer's.'
    Since then he has developed three main obsessions:

    - repeating the same 6 mile walk, initially daily, but just starting to go out twice each day
    - playing Solitaire over and over again for long periods of time
    - sweet things either cake or S****ers bars.

    The one concerning me most is the obsession with sweet things as this is beginning to cause some behaviour problems. At the weekend, we were in a well known pound shop, when he tried to pile the entire stock on the shelf into his arms to buy. He was very determined and he really took some persuading to put most of them back on the shelf.

    We went to a Xmas Fayre. I turned round to see him just helping himself to cakes from the cake stall. Again he was really stubborn and took some persuading to stop.

    Today we went to a Community tea at a local primary school. The Headteacher said there were small bags of chocolates in the middle of each table, as a small gift from the children to each of us. We were asked to take one packet each at the end. OH grabbed all bags, immediately started opening and eating them. When I gently tried to persuade him to put some back, he got cross and told me to 'B***er off!' in front of the school children.

    I feel embarrassed by his behaviour but also concerned because he is diabetic. He behaves in a very childlike manner and is becoming increasingly difficult to manage when we are out.

    I'm beginning to wonder if it is Alzheimer's or does it sound more like FTD? Do I need to go back to the consultant and ask for a more accurate diagnosis now?

    Can anyone give me any advice on how to manage this behaviour? Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
    Thank you!
    JigJog x
     
  2. exhausted 2015

    exhausted 2015 Registered User

    Jul 5, 2015
    624
    Female
    stoke on trent
    #2 exhausted 2015, Dec 2, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015
    Hi jig jog I'm no expert but I think this craving for sweet foods is common in dementia my dad has mixed dementia Vascular dementia and Alzheimers disease and he is always eating sweet foods or toffees even through the night, could you have a discreet word with his gp about it.. Best wishes exhausted 2015 xx
     
  3. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241
    Thank you for responding, exhausted 2015. I think you are right. A visit to the GP seems the best way to go. Xx
     
  4. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,402
    Male
    Cornwall
    fronto-temporal-dementia is usually diagnosed either with a PET and SPECT brain scan or an Autopsy

    PET (Positron Emission Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that involves capturing cross-sectional images of the brain, much like CT scanning. The images that are created are functional rather than the structural images of CT and MRI. Functional images capture how various parts of the brain are working, which makes it a diagnostic tool for neurodegenerative conditions such as FRONTO-TEMPORAL-DEMENTIA . Areas of the frontal or temporal lobes that are not as active as they should be may indicate FTD.

    The PET scan involves the injection of a radioisotope, or tracer, into a hand or arm vein. The tracer emits positrons, which collide with electrons, or negatively charged particles, producing gamma rays which are similar to X-rays. These gamma rays are detected by a ring-shaped PET scanner and analyzed by a computer to form an image of brain metabolism. These tests are very expensive and not covered by all insurance policies. Check with your insurance provider to see what tests are covered or if pre-approval is needed.

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that is very similar to PET. SPECT measures blood flow and activity levels in the brain, which make it a diagnostic tool for identifying behavioral and cognitive problems in persons with neurodegenerative conditions such as FTD.

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography): PET (Positron Emission Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that is very similar to PET. SPECT measures blood flow and activity levels in the brain, which make it a diagnostic tool for identifying behavioral and cognitive problems in persons with neurodegenerative conditions such as FTD.
     
  5. CeliaThePoet

    CeliaThePoet Registered User

    Dec 7, 2013
    614
    Buffalo, NY, USA
  6. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,383
    Female
    South coast
    As dementia progresses more and more of the brain is affected, so that, eventually all the different types of dementia end up with the same symptoms.
    The point about FTD (and i assume you mean the behaviour variant) is that the sort of behavior your dad is showing are the among the first symptoms to show. In the initial stage bvFTD also doesnt show other symptoms typical of Alzheimers - often the short-term memory is OK too.

    If your dad has already been diagnosed with Alz 2 years ago and has only recently started with these symptoms, then IMO its probably not FTD.
     
  7. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241

    Thanks Tony! This really does explain the different types of scan to me. Great stuff!
     
  8. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241
  9. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241
    Canary, thanks for taking the time to explain this. It really does help.Much appreciated. Best Wishes to you x
     
  10. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,402
    Male
    Cornwall
    JigJog that's ok I was first diagnosed with Alzheimer's and after 3 years sent for a PET scan and year later the SPEC scan both confirmed damage to the frontal lobes of the brain although I would prefer not to have Alzheimer's or Frontal-temporal-dementia personally I think the FTD is better for Me it's not so aggressive on the persons memory or ability having seen my dad with Alzheimer's he did know what day of the week or his children's names but once you have either just get on with life while you can
     
  11. JigJog

    JigJog Registered User

    Nov 6, 2013
    241
    Great advice Tony! I often read your posts with interest and know that you have FTD; what I didn't know was that you had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's 3 years previously.

    Please keep posting Tony and I'll keep reading. Your posts are invaluable.

    Many thanks,
    JigJog x
     

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