Altzheimers progresses faster in highly educated

Geraldine

Registered User
Oct 17, 2003
143
Nottingham
Hi

Apparantly the more highly educated you are the later in life you get the condition and when you do get it, it progresses faster. At last all these courses I keep doing at work have some meaning!!!

Geraldine
An almost 50 year old dedicated lifelong learner!
 

Amy

Registered User
Jan 4, 2006
3,453
Well a lot of those that I teach need have no fear for the future then!! (and that is no reflection on my teaching I hope.)
Amy
 

Lila13

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
1,342
How can they possibly know, given that it can't be properly diagnosed until after death (when it's too late to be relevant for most of us anyway, though post mortem tests might be useful for research for future generations)?

My mother was still trying to continue her education until recent months, and was very sad about giving up Countdown, University Challenge, books, newspapers. I tried to persuade her it was only the malnutrition and dehydration slowing her brain down, but neither of us ever really believed it.
 

jc141265

Registered User
Sep 16, 2005
836
45
Australia
The other side

Dad - 54 when diagnosed, still going strong (health wise - not mentally) at age 61...most 'highly intelligent' man I have ever met.
 

connie

Registered User
Mar 7, 2004
9,519
Frinton-on-Sea
Nat, agree with you. Lionel diagnosedat 60, after 5/6 years of confusion.
Still going strong at 64.

Can still do the crossword in the Guardian if you read out the clues, and write them in for him (on a good day). Still more highly intelligent than I will ever be.

No answer.......Connie
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,424
66
Toronto, Canada
Well the researchers can't seem to make up their minds.

I'm either damned or saved - dropped out of university but do the crossword every day & am a voracious reader.

Oh well - what the h*ll!
 

Lynne

Registered User
Jun 3, 2005
3,433
Suffolk,England
Not exactly rocket science ...

but (referring to the original subject, not anyone here who has replied! :) ) Surely it's just a matter of the mental decline being more noticeable in someone who was previously highly intelligent, articulate and/or well educated?
 

Brucie

Registered User
Jan 31, 2004
12,413
near London
Lynne

Absolutely, and they might also be more likely to pick up the fact themselves that they cannot do something they consider they should be able to, and bring it to someone's attention.

Jan commented to me on her being unable to remember some things - and this was way, way before any symptoms appeared.

Of course, I just reassured her at the time, because my memory has always been lousy with names, for instance, and I thought it might just be part of aging, for her.