Aggression & visit to the dentist

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by Vegpatch, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:52 PM.

  1. Vegpatch

    Vegpatch Registered User

    Nov 3, 2016
    10
    my dad is in a care home, and has become very aggressive over the last year or so, especially around personal care. He hits, kicks, spits, screams - he is extremely strong and can really hurt those around him.

    Unfortunately, he lost his dentures mid December (whole left side of his top palate), and we’ve decided to try and get some new ones for him. The mould from his precious set are not available to use, so we need to start again.

    If he becomes very violent at the dentist, we will of course stop - he’ll have to do without dentures. But i’m Concerned about the impact on his speech and eating (he is already on a weight plan due to weight loss).

    I will be taking him to the dentist tomorrow, along with a carer from the home to support me. Does anyone have any tips on how to make this visit as easy as possible for him ? i’m Going to put classical music on the car radio (he loved classical music), and will be constantly reassuring him and talking to him. The GP has also prescribed diazepam for this visit.

    I don’t know what the dentures process will entail, but am presuming they’ll need to put something in his mouth - am very worried that he will become violent.
     
  2. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    11,086
    Female
    South coast
    I think the diazepam is the stuff - give him maximum dosage 15 - 20 mins before the appointment and be very careful to watch over him going home as he will be very unsteady on his feet.

    My OH has to have this before seeing a dentist - not because he is violent, but because he has uncontrolled epilepsy and its to make sure that he doesnt have a seizure while work is being done. It really knocks him out, but at least there havent been any problems, so far. If you have problems getting him there or getting him back, you can get referred to community dentists, who will come out to the home.
     
  3. Vegpatch

    Vegpatch Registered User

    Nov 3, 2016
    10
    Thanks canary....we looked at the community dentist, but there’s a 6 month waiting list ! ..which for new dentures is a bit of a problem !
    Hopefully the diazepam will work it’s magic...x
     
  4. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,494
    Male
    North Manchester
    If you are considering asking the dentist to sedate it could be worthwhile asking before the visit if (s)he is prepared to sedate a PWD without reference to a GP.
     
  5. anxious annie

    anxious annie Registered User

    Jan 2, 2019
    222
    Do the community dentists come to the care home to do check ups, or treatments? ( Sorry to just ask a question, Vegpatch, I don't have any experience or advice on sedation. Hope all goes well for your visit tomorrow.
     
  6. Vegpatch

    Vegpatch Registered User

    Nov 3, 2016
    10
    I haven’t seen any evidence of them doing check ups at the home...but a good thing to check ! Dad gets missed off a lot of things due to his aggression...
     
  7. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    11,086
    Female
    South coast
    There wasnt a community dentist who came regularly at mums care home

    6m is a long wait for treatment :confused:
     
  8. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    As a denture wearer, the process for making a new plate is a bit of a faff.
    I do wonder if he will be able to do it.

    Basically the dentist will fill a plastic mouth shaped *thing* with quick set rubbery stuff ( sorry, cant describe it any better!) and insert it in his mouth, when he will be required to bite and then release, and the dentist then removed the plate/rubbery stuff gently, with the impression on it.

    it has to stay in his mouth a couple of minutes while it sets, and he'll need (ideally!) to breath thru his nose, rather than his mouth. Being sedated might make it more difficult, as he does need to close down and bite, to align the bite properly.

    If he has been a long time denture wearer , he may suprise you and recognise what happening and comply

    Good luck!
     

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