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Affects of dehydration

Millie51

Registered User
Jan 11, 2015
17
Napier, New Zealand
I've noticed since being diagnosed, that I get very foggy if I haven't been drinking enough fluid. I make sure that I drink as much as I can during the day, usually some form of flavoured water - hate water from the tap :) Hopefully, this tip will be handy for everyone - dementia causes dehydration, so keep those fluids up x
 

Lyncus

Registered User
Oct 30, 2014
16
Warwickshire
Hi Millie, yes I agree, myself and my sister care for my mother with Alzhiemers, you do need to keep hydrated, my mothers memory is very affected if dehydrated. Mum is now in her third year of the disease and we have to do everything for her, getting her to drink enough is a problem at the moment. X
 

Soobee

Registered User
Aug 22, 2009
2,734
South
It's just as important for those in later stages of dementia. My mum had a safeguarding meeting because she got severely dehydrated at home and none of us realised just how little liquid she had taken in for a couple of days. Not my dad, not the carers, nor me visiting.

She looked like she was dying and the GP thought so too; as soon as she got IV liquids she was back to her usual self the next day.

Please please check that dehydration is not the cause if your loved one looks or feels in a bad way.
 

Millie51

Registered User
Jan 11, 2015
17
Napier, New Zealand
Hi Millie, yes I agree, myself and my sister care for my mother with Alzhiemers, you do need to keep hydrated, my mothers memory is very affected if dehydrated. Mum is now in her third year of the disease and we have to do everything for her, getting her to drink enough is a problem at the moment. X
Glad your Mum's got you both to look after her, I'm surprised how different I feel if I haven't drunk enough. It must be difficult if you can't get her to drink as well, I'll be thinking of you x
 

Millie51

Registered User
Jan 11, 2015
17
Napier, New Zealand
It's just as important for those in later stages of dementia. My mum had a safeguarding meeting because she got severely dehydrated at home and none of us realised just how little liquid she had taken in for a couple of days. Not my dad, not the carers, nor me visiting.

She looked like she was dying and the GP thought so too; as soon as she got IV liquids she was back to her usual self the next day.

Please please check that dehydration is not the cause if your loved one looks or feels in a bad way.
I'm so glad your Mum was caught in time, I've heard of a couple of cases the same as your Mum, totally dehydrated - hope she keeps better now x
 

shelagh

Registered User
Sep 28, 2009
476
Staffordshire
another thing to watch for.

Yes, definitely try and drink more, it does make you feel better x
I couldn't agree more about the hydration. Also watch out for urinary infections as well., I had a bad one before Christmas and was literally out of my head, seeing rats and maggots in the parcels that were coming in, believing everyone hated me. Eventually we called the memory clinic for help for the first time. The wonderful CPN who came out said let's check the physical things first, gave me a potty to do a wee, checked and got me onto antibiotics the same afternoon. I knew URTI's affected people badly in later dementia but hadn't realised it can affect anyone. I recognise cystitis when I get it = what woman doesn't but had no symptoms from this infection. So if you have a sudden drastic change in your condition check for this asap.
 

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