advice needed on home help/care costs

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Ellie100, Jan 4, 2016.

  1. Ellie100

    Ellie100 Registered User

    Jan 4, 2016
    4
    Hello
    I wasn’t sure where to post this message. I hope this is the right place.

    My father in law, David, has dementia and the family are struggling to deal with the situation. My husband seems to be sticking his head in the sand and hoping it will all go away…I don’t mean that in a nasty way…..it’s just his way of dealing with it I think. My husband’s sister is also having to look after her husband who has advanced stages of lung cancer and my husband’s mum is an elderly lady herself and is managing the best she can. David spent most of Christmas day sat on the stairs at home trying on various shoes…taking them off…putting them back on…repeat. He did not want to be moved and got very upset when we tried to move him. Each time we see him he seems to be getting worse to the point I do sometimes think he really does not know who we are. I just need some help to understand what the options are in relation to home care. Currently I think they get a couple of hours once a week. That was all they were told they could have. Do you think this could be reassessed now he has worsened? Also does anyone have any experience of what are the hourly rates would be if the family decided to club together and pay for some home care/help privately?

    Thank you for any advice you can give.
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,696
    Female
    London
    Unfortunately, costs for LA funded and private care can vary hugely throughout the UK. I think first you should ask for another needs and carers assessment and make it clear what it is you are after: carers, befrienders, day care and/or respite? They cannot just fob you of, the right to a carers assessment is enshrined in law. I would also contact your local Alzheimer's Society, Age UK and the Carers Centre for options, support and advocacy. If you get no joy, Social Services should be able to give you a list of care agencies. I would check them out thoroughly and not simply pick the cheapest though.

    With regards to David's behaviour, as long as it's harmless and he finds joy in trying on shoes, I would just let him be.

    Best of luck.
     
  3. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    Hi Ellie50

    I pay £15.50 an hour for home help via Age UK. Hope it helps

    Best wishes
    Sue:)
     
  4. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,482
    Radcliffe on Trent
    If your FIL's needs have increased then the new assessed care package should be funded either from his income, or if his income and savings are below the threshold by the LA. Do you know if there been any financial assessment already?

    It should not be necessary for any other family members to fund his care needs, including your MIL.
     
  5. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    I totally agree with Pickles but depends where you are in the country how well and or quickly things are dealt with.
     
  6. Ellie100

    Ellie100 Registered User

    Jan 4, 2016
    4
    Thank you for your reply. No I don't think they have been financially accessed yet. How do I find out what the LA threshold is? Are they set amounts?
     
  7. Ellie100

    Ellie100 Registered User

    Jan 4, 2016
    4
    Thank you for your reply. They are in Hertfordshire... Is that good or bad I wonder??!!
     
  8. Ellie100

    Ellie100 Registered User

    Jan 4, 2016
    4
    Sorry what I meant to ask is does the savings threshold they mention mean cash in the bank or the house they live in too?
     
  9. Jonny1

    Jonny1 Account on hold

    Apr 9, 2015
    10
    Nantwich, Cheshire
    Hi - I've tried 2 different private care companies in the last year. I started off with one that was about £10ph - can't see how that do it for that price given the minimum wage etc. But I found that the carers were not staying very long as:
    1) They weren't paid for travelling and their patch was quite large
    2) Mum always says that there is nothing to do even though there could be lots for them to do

    Mum ended up with many different care visitors from them and didn't like this.

    The next company who we still use now charge £18ph. I learnt from last time and chose a smaller local company - we have figured a rota so that there are only 5 or so carers that come out. We have booked longer sessions - they stay for the whole time and have enough time to take mum out in the car or her wheelchair 3 times a week - which has really improved her outlook.

    I hope you find a company that works for you
     
  10. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,696
    Female
    London
    #10 Beate, Jan 4, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2016
    It's more about your FIL's financial threshold. If he has over £23,250 he will be classed as self-funding. Under £14,500 the state should fund him. Obviously it all depends on what services his borough has and how much they cost. There is usually an LA rate for care homes which you can ask them for.

    https://www.moneyadviceservice.org....thority-funding-for-care-costs-do-you-qualify

    Also, make sure he receives all the allowances he is entitled to, like Attendance Allowance.
    https://www.moneyadviceservice.org....thority-funding-for-care-costs-do-you-qualify
     
  11. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,482
    Radcliffe on Trent
    And MIL may also be eligible for Carer's allowance.

    The value of the house is excluded as long as FIL or MIL are living in it.
     
  12. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,924
    Male
    North Manchester
    "...my husband’s mum is an elderly lady herself and is managing the best she can..."

    Care of a non personal nature can be provided free for her husband if this care helps her get on with her own life. The care could be providing somebody to sit with her husband while she did her shopping or even going to see friends. The care is provided to help her and is based on an assessment of her needs as distinct from those of her husband.

    "It may be that the best way to meet a carer's needs is to provide care and support directly to the person they care for – for example, by providing replacement care to allow someone to take a break from caring. It's possible to do this as long as the person needing care agrees...

    Charging and financial assessment for carers

    In most cases, local authorities don't charge for providing support to carers, in recognition of the valuable contribution carers make to their local community. But this is something the local authority can decide."


    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/pages/carers-rights-care-act-2014.aspx
     

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