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Advantages of Dementia Assessment

Emilypen

New member
Jul 14, 2019
33
0
My husband was diagnosed with dementia a year ago, by our GP. At the time she asked him if he wanted to have a formal assessment, but he declined. Recently, I have been receiving support from a Dementia UK worker, who thinks he would benefit from the formal assessment. However, he is happily unaware of his condition. He hates any form of health appointment - doctor, optician, chiropodist - and becomes quite anxious about it. He also hates tests of any kind. The Dementia UK lady, tells me these tests could last for months! My inclination is to decline on his behalf, but I wondered if anyone can tell me if the benefits outweigh the possible stress, for us both!
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
66,374
0
71
Dundee
@Emilypen I think everyone is differnt in terms of the possible stress of going through the process. You know your husband best in terms of whether he should go through the formal diagnosis process. My husband died over 5 years ago, he had Alzheimer’s. He did go through the formal process for diagnosis but he was not stressed by it. I was keen to have the diagnosis as I knew that this was the only way he would get access to the available Alzheimer’s medications.

I wondered if this factsheet would be of any help to you -

 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
11,896
0
Yorkshire
hi @Emilypen
a more specific diagnosis might lead to meds being prescribed if it is Alzheimer's
and it may be worth checking with your GP whether they would fill in the medical form when you apply for Attendance Allowance and disregard of Council Tax (so the household is assessed as if single occupancy ie 25% reduction)

do also arrange LPAs for both of you (and up to date wills) if these haven't yet been completed
 

collins35

New member
Nov 17, 2018
5
0
My husband was formally diagnosed in 2017 although we were aware of his dementia for more than 5 years previous to that. It did take several appointments and a brain scan, and there were follow-up session but these were optional and an official diagnosis can make things easier in some ways. It means that you could qualify for a reduction in council tax (if there are just the two of you resident in the house). It made it easier for us to get a blue badge, and can give you access to Social Workers (necessary for in-home care plans etc.) occupational therapists and other health care professionals which can help with equipment as mobility etc begins to deteriorate. Regrettably it is one of those occasions when 'a piece of paper' can open some helpful doors. Unfortunately things do not tend to progress in a gentle downward slope but rather in steps and if you decide the time is not yet right for formal assessment I would recommend you keep a close eye on progress as assessment arrangements take time to arrange, leaving you in limbo at a time when you could need more help.

You need to be thinking of both your futures, and what could be helpful to you personally as you start down this very difficult road.
 

Emilypen

New member
Jul 14, 2019
33
0
@Emilypen I think everyone is differnt in terms of the possible stress of going through the process. You know your husband best in terms of whether he should go through the formal diagnosis process. My husband died over 5 years ago, he had Alzheimer’s. He did go through the formal process for diagnosis but he was not stressed by it. I was keen to have the diagnosis as I knew that this was the only way he would get access to the available Alzheimer’s medications.

I wondered if this factsheet would be of any help to you -


@Emilypen I think everyone is differnt in terms of the possible stress of going through the process. You know your husband best in terms of whether he should go through the formal diagnosis process. My husband died over 5 years ago, he had Alzheimer’s. He did go through the formal process for diagnosis but he was not stressed by it. I was keen to have the diagnosis as I knew that this was the only way he would get access to the available Alzheimer’s medications.

I wondered if this factsheet would be of any help to you -

Thankyou, Izzy. That's very helpful. I'll print off the leaflet and read it. I'll also pass it to my daughter. She feels I should encourage my husband to have the assessment. I'm just very concerned about his reaction to all this.
 

Emilypen

New member
Jul 14, 2019
33
0
hi @Emilypen
a more specific diagnosis might lead to meds being prescribed if it is Alzheimer's
and it may be worth checking with your GP whether they would fill in the medical form when you apply for Attendance Allowance and disregard of Council Tax (so the household is assessed as if single occupancy ie 25% reduction)

do also arrange LPAs for both of you (and up to date wills) if these haven't yet been completed
Thank you Shedrech. I do have both POAs and I have just applied for Attendance Allowance. I've yet to apply for reduction in council tax.
 

Emilypen

New member
Jul 14, 2019
33
0
My husband was formally diagnosed in 2017 although we were aware of his dementia for more than 5 years previous to that. It did take several appointments and a brain scan, and there were follow-up session but these were optional and an official diagnosis can make things easier in some ways. It means that you could qualify for a reduction in council tax (if there are just the two of you resident in the house). It made it easier for us to get a blue badge, and can give you access to Social Workers (necessary for in-home care plans etc.) occupational therapists and other health care professionals which can help with equipment as mobility etc begins to deteriorate. Regrettably it is one of those occasions when 'a piece of paper' can open some helpful doors. Unfortunately things do not tend to progress in a gentle downward slope but rather in steps and if you decide the time is not yet right for formal assessment I would recommend you keep a close eye on progress as assessment arrangements take time to arrange, leaving you in limbo at a time when you could need more help.

You need to be thinking of both your futures, and what could be helpful to you personally as you start down this very difficult road.
Thank you collins35. I have been very lucky in having good support in our area. We have a dementia hub in our town which includes Wayfinders, a Dementia UK advisory service. I need to think carefully about my husband's assessment. I just don't want to expose him to more stress and anxiety.
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
14,831
0
England
Thank you Shedrech. I do have both POAs and I have just applied for Attendance Allowance. I've yet to apply for reduction in council tax.
I’m sure you will need proof of severely mentally impaired to claim the 25% discount in council tax. Dementia comes under the heading of the not so nice sounding severely mentally impaired.
 

Jale

Registered User
Jul 9, 2018
663
0
Mum had an initial assessment with her GP and was then referred to the memory clinic for a scan. I refused to let mum go for the scan as I know it would have traumatised her, the consultant from the clinic did contact me, he had seen her medical records and said he was 99% that she had vascular dementia but couldn't say unconditionally because there was no scan. Mum had had a scan prior to this when she was admitted to hospital so it was likely that was taken into consideration. He also said that no meds would help at the stage that she was at.
As far as I am aware it didn't change/stop the help and advice that we had from Social Workers/Financial Assessments/Incontinence clinic and then carers going in.
 

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