AD;Not just a mental health disease

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by allylee, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Michael

    Of course you're entitled to use whatever language you like to describe your circumstances, and I accept that you weren't describing John. It hit a nerve, that's all. John is a very nice man -- in a way that makes life easier for me, and I'm grateful.

    But on the other hand it makes his illness more poignant. So many people are having to cope with horrific situations, and I wonder how much longer his 'niceness' can last.

    'Normal' for me is doing all the things we have always done, for as long as possible, while being aware that the posssibilities are narrowing year by year.

    He's not ga ga, he's a very intelligent man (he was an architect), who sadly has lost the ability to communicate. And how frustrating is that?

    Love,
     
  2. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    16,018
    Toronto, Canada
    My mother has changed also but not so much to look at. Since she's now in a wheelchair, you can't see the swaying, shuffling, hesitant walk anymore. She still looks beautiful but she does have that blank expression most of the time now. Once in a while she'll giggle and smile and be my mother again.

    Joanne
     
  3. panda

    panda Registered User

    Apr 16, 2006
    88
    Surrey
    How come my mum can look in the mirror and not notice the change in herself,but when shown a recent photograph of my daughter and her on her birthday she said I look like a lost soul. I found that very strange
     
  4. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #24 Margarita, Apr 2, 2007
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2007

    Maybe panda she can feel more , then relate to what she see in the mirrow or photo . Just a thought , so she telling you what she is feeling not what she is seeing , if you get my point
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    of course, it depends whether "Ga-Ga" is a word in one's 'normal' vocabulary for people who are unwell. ;)

    I avoid any of these as 'abnormal' in my own vocab but these things are, as with everything, personal choice.
     
  6. mocha

    mocha Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    176
    Lancs, England
    Ron is 6' and after serving in the RAF used to walk as straight as a ramrod, so sad now to seem to have lost about 6" and shuffles his feet as he walks but I will never stop taking photo's of him as one day they will be all I have left.
    At the moment the latest ones sit in my mobile[ haven't found out how to dowload them yet]
    Had a bit of a weep on Sunday as it was such a gorgeous day and we would have been miles away in the car having a picnic. Happy days!!
    love Aileen
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,920
    Kent
    Dear Aileen,
    You struck a chord in your post.
    It`s not always about how they look or even how they are, but about what we could be doing.
    With love
     

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