Activity ideas please..

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Sehseh, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. Sehseh

    Sehseh Registered User

    Oct 7, 2015
    2
    Hi,
    I am going to be full time carer for a week for my Dad (whilst my mum has a well deserved week in the sun). I usually have him one day a week, and try to do something with him...maybe a walk or go for a drive to somewhere he may recognise.

    But desperately trying to think of other ideas of how to fill in the full week...he will be extra anxious with my mum being away, so just need some distraction ideas?

    How do you guys fill the days in?
    Many thanks :)
     
  2. grove

    grove Registered User

    Aug 24, 2010
    7,724
    North Yorkshire
    Morning.

    Sehshe. , How lovely your Mum is having a well deserved :). Holiday & am glad you will be Caring for your Father well done. !

    As for Activities you did not say what stage your Dad is or what his hobbies are etc so giving a good reply is not going too be easy ! How ever I help look after my Father (when Mum has some free time for her self ). & I play Dominos etc with Dad. Which he enjoys ! ! Does your Dad like too play Cards or listen too music. ? Or Visiting the Park etc. ? Or Remencing with old family Photos etc ? (you could make a memory book before your Mum goes on Holiday)

    Hope that helps. :). & wishing your Mum a lovely holiday. Good Luck in your caring week Hope all goes well for you both.

    Grove. X
     
  3. mancmum

    mancmum Registered User

    Feb 6, 2012
    385
    I have a box of things stashed away for times when they might be needed so I don't get caught on the hop or want a few minutes off.

    Plasticine, a book he chose, a game, colouring in.

    Write on items that they are present from you, or from someone else....or even wrap them up. Be prepared for him to spend 30 minutes looking at the inscription of who the gift is from. It gives you a good feeling to get a present.

    Activities are weather dependent. Going on google earth and looking at his childhood home is good when you can commit one to one time.

    Cleaning silver, oiling bits of wood are good when I need to get on with another task.

    Slow down and add in extra time. Perhaps he can help get the meal ready ...albeit slowly and not exactly as you might like.

    Watching things you can comment on and burble away at. Dads Army, Liverbirds, Good Old Days. Thank goodness for all this old stuff coming back. He cannot remember whats going on, but he knows who the Liverbirds are.

    Have enough money if you can manage it to get a cup of coffee or tea and cake somewhere so you can stay and sit and chat. Actually most successful places for us are cafes with a view of what is going on rather than someone a bit fancy. That activity outside provides the spark for conversations.

    Have a memory board for him...if it works for him...telling him when your mum will be back.
     
  4. Sehseh

    Sehseh Registered User

    Oct 7, 2015
    2
    Thank you

    Hi Grove and mancmum,

    Sorry about delayed reply, new to the forum!
    My dad is middle stage early onset, aged 66 and diagnosed 4 years ago.

    Thank you useful tips. Not sure he would be up for playing cards (or be able to!) but loves music, so will dig out a few of his faves.

    His speak is very poor so conversation is difficult, but will certainly try going to places like cafes where I can talk about what's going on.

    Will let you know how I'm getting on.

    Definitely going to use this forum it's great xxx
     
  5. chris53

    chris53 Registered User

    Nov 9, 2009
    2,930
    London
    Good evening Sehseh, a warm welcome to Talking Point:) glad you have found us, and hope this friendly and helpful website will be of use to you.
    Good luck with your care role am sure it will go just fine and that your mum has a lovely break.
    Take care
    Chris
     

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