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Activities

clairedelacey

Registered User
Dec 15, 2015
22
Northumberland
Hello everyone,

My Dad has been in his care home for 6 weeks now and I feel that there is a lack of activities I would like to try and do something about this and would like to organise some kind of activity for the residents to make their life more interesting, it must be so boring for them doing nothing much every day.

I just wondered if any of you had done anything like this and if so what did you do? The residents are mainly mid to late stage alzheimer's so it's hard to think of anything. My daughter has a very well behaved Labrador and a new puppy so I thought I may ask the home if she could bring them in maybe? but I would really like to organise something else like music or games for them?

I would appreciate any ideas.


Thanks
Claire xx
 

pamann

Registered User
Oct 28, 2013
2,635
Kent
Hello Claire, my husband is in a CH, they have a activities lady, employed to entertain the residents. They do :- carpet bowls, skittles, bingo, darts not normal darts they have velcro on the tips, painting, colouring books, baking biscuits or buns,
A lady from Pat Dogs comes in once a fortnight with a greyhound or deerhound, the residents love her.
Once a month a singer comes for an hour to sing all the old songs, sometimes the local theatre group do a short play, musical comedy. Every day there is something for them to do, some fall asleep!!!
Hope this gives you some ideas.
 

fizzie

Registered User
Jul 20, 2011
2,730
The home should be organising daily activities - morning and afternoon. there is a site for activity coordinators on facebook GeriActive UK. Brilliant ideas on there, have a look

Lots of people love some music or bean bag games or a bit of baking, colouring, pictures of the Royals or if you can find out what they did before they retired - either hobbies or work wise this usually inspires some chat.

I think it is fantastic that you want to get involved. You could take the dog with the managers permission and the residents would probably love it to visit

Card making with bits and bobs often goes down a treat
or if you can sing then using the alphabet to think of songs and then having a little sing song and a dance

Someone else posted this today
http://po.st/u9ZLuE

which looks good - i hope the link works

I should think the care home would be delighted but you never know!

Well done you xxx
 

onlyme1

Registered User
Sep 10, 2011
105
scarborough
hi claire
my mum and dad are in a care home where there's already quite a lot going on. I've got into the habit of running a 'sing song' on a sunday afternoon and many of the residents join in by singing, dancing, clapping or tapping. I don't know what stages the other residents are at, just their names and what songs and sweets they seem to like best (I take in a variety of sweets and chocolate and encourage people to pass them round like any family would, sometimes fruit too ). I felt a bit daft at first but soon got into it. I've also taken stuff along in baskets for people to fiddle and rummage about with but stuff easily disappears! they have dogs visiting too. if you get to know them a bit you'll get ideas for activities. good luck, I hope you enjoy it!
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,670
South coast
I think its a lovely idea, but please do bare in mind that some of the people who are in the later stages may not want, or be able, to join in games etc. Mum is in a CH and they have activities arranged, but mum no longer understands them. She does, however, still enjoy rummage boxes and loves her fiddle rug.
 

Leeds

Registered User
Sep 20, 2015
160
Hello everyone,

My Dad has been in his care home for 6 weeks now and I feel that there is a lack of activities I would like to try and do something about this and would like to organise some kind of activity for the residents to make their life more interesting, it must be so boring for them doing nothing much every day.

I just wondered if any of you had done anything like this and if so what did you do? The residents are mainly mid to late stage alzheimer's so it's hard to think of anything. My daughter has a very well behaved Labrador and a new puppy so I thought I may ask the home if she could bring them in maybe? but I would really like to organise something else like music or games for them?

I would appreciate any ideas.

Ditto, dad has been in a lovely home since November but the activities which are organised are very female orientated. The lounge is often filled with the ladies and the men are in their rooms. I offered to volunteer my services but have hit a brick wall. The dreaded health and safety, dad would enjoy tinkering in a shed with fixing things. Has anyone got experience of organising some "DIY" type activities in homes. Leeds x


Thanks
Claire xx
Hello everyone,

My Dad has been in his care home for 6 weeks now and I feel that there is a lack of activities I would like to try and do something about this and would like to organise some kind of activity for the residents to make their life more interesting, it must be so boring for them doing nothing much every day.

Ditto, dad has been in a lovely home since November but the activities which are organised are very female orientated. The lounge is often filled with the ladies and the men are in their rooms. I offered to volunteer my services but have hit a brick wall. The dreaded health and safety, dad would enjoy tinkering in a shed with fixing things. Has anyone got experience of organising some "DIY" type activities in homes. Leeds x
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,670
South coast
It can be difficult to organise activities for men. The problem with DIY and dementia is that just about all tools can used as weapons if they get into the wrong hands (and believe me - thats a valid concern :( ) - its the same for the ladies who used to do needlework. They cant have pins, needles, scissors etc.

Was your dad interested in gardening? If so, maybe planting seeds or bulbs and looking after pot plants might be of interest, or if they have a garden you may be able to help him do things in there.

I know this is probably for people further along the dementia pathway than your dad, but I am in the process of putting together a rummage box for men on a DIY theme and it has brought home to me how difficult it is. I have had to resort to realistic looking plastic "tools" together with plastic wall plugs, wooden handles, wing nuts and a folding wooden rule.
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
11,905
London
My OH loves drawing, painting, colouring in, writing and sorting his pack of cards. Of course those aren't group activities. For those armchair exercise is good, skittles, bingo, quizzes, gardening, baking... His day centre also has a snooker table in a side room, that is often frequented by males.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,035
Scotland
My husbands DC use large soft balls from IKEA which they tell me cost £3.00 each. These are used for throwing exercises while seated in their chairs. They are so squishy they couldn't hurt anyone.

They also keep a big box of silly hats and headgear which people can choose to wear and they all get a laugh. The sort of things fans wear to football or headbands with ears or antlers, tiaras and crowns. Another box of musical instruments like maracas and tambourines adds to the mayhem.
 

Leeds

Registered User
Sep 20, 2015
160
It can be difficult to organise activities for men. The problem with DIY and dementia is that just about all tools can used as weapons if they get into the wrong hands (and believe me - thats a valid concern :( ) - its the same for the ladies who used to do needlework. They cant have pins, needles, scissors etc.

Was your dad interested in gardening? If so, maybe planting seeds or bulbs and looking after pot plants might be of interest, or if they have a garden you may be able to help him do things in there.

I know this is probably for people further along the dementia pathway than your dad, but I am in the process of putting together a rummage box for men on a DIY theme and it has brought home to me how difficult it is. I have had to resort to realistic looking plastic "tools" together with plastic wall plugs, wooden handles, wing nuts and a folding wooden rule.
That's sounds very interesting, I was thinking of putting together pieces of wood with sandpaper, pre drill pieces for wall plugs, sorting out nuts and bolts into containers, putting dowels into pre drilled holes etc. Leedsx
 

clairedelacey

Registered User
Dec 15, 2015
22
Northumberland
Thanks everyone for all of the replies and ideas, I've spoken to the care home manger Steve tonight and he said it's fine to take the puppy in as long as I take him when he's there as he loves Labradors, well who wouldn't love a Labrador puppy!! I think the residents will enjoy it and it would be good for Bear (puppy) too and will get him used to being handled by other people. I wish I could sing as I'd love to do some kind of sing song, Dad loves singing the old songs. I'll let you know how it goes.
Thanks again
Claire xxx
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,670
South coast
That's sounds very interesting, I was thinking of putting together pieces of wood with sandpaper, pre drill pieces for wall plugs, sorting out nuts and bolts into containers, putting dowels into pre drilled holes etc. Leedsx
I like the idea of pre-drilled holes for wall plugs and dowels :)
Not sure about the sandpaper - you have to think about what it might get used for and what might get sanded (not just the wood provided :eek:). Nuts and bolts - you have to make sure that there are no sharp edges. Its certainly made me put on my thinking cap
 

Aisling

Registered User
Dec 5, 2015
1,806
Ireland
I like the idea of pre-drilled holes for wall plugs and dowels :)
Not sure about the sandpaper - you have to think about what it might get used for and what might get sanded (not just the wood provided :eek:). Nuts and bolts - you have to make sure that there are no sharp edges. Its certainly made me put on my thinking cap
Yes I agree with Canary re activities. One must be so careful in this area. What seems like a good idea may be dangerous. Everyone is so different. In my opinion sometimes there might be too much emphasis of activities; of course it is important to encourage mobility if this is possible, but not everyone likes to be forced/ encouraged to participate in activities for activities sake! I believe that the focus must be on the individual with AD.

Family members know what the person with AS enjoys and great to ask staff re same. Bet the visit of the Labrador goes well and that staff member will be present as some people are terrified of dogs.

Yes most people enjoy music but dare I say that a short session of same may suit others. It is important that if a person only likes a short session, then the option is there to move away from it. Likewise with other activities.

People study methodology of being able to be still for a while and or meditate. Am trying to find the correct words here as I don't want to offend anyone but Heaven help anyone who tries to encourage my OH to do some activity in which he has no interest. A suggestion re picture books by Speech and Language professional went down like a lead balloon. "I am not a child" he will help his grandson to colour in a picture but I wouldn't dare ask him to colour a picture on his own. He walks around and is content with me as his " invisible shadow".

People with AD may sometimes seem to act like a child but they are not children. Regardless of what this awful disease brings, I believe that they must be treated with the highest form of respect and consideration. We need to be able to allow them to take time to be still. We need to do our best to engage with their reality and not impose ours on them.

Aisling
 

Chrismitch

Registered User
Jun 23, 2011
127
We got around the 'child' issue by asking people to decorate a poster advertising the 'cafe'. They felt they were doing a helpful job.


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
 

Leeds

Registered User
Sep 20, 2015
160
We got around the 'child' issue by asking people to decorate a poster advertising the 'cafe'. They felt they were doing a helpful job.


Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
Absolutely agree, dad responds well to being asked for help rather than activities for the sake of it. leedsx
 

JPC

Registered User
Apr 28, 2016
1
Care Homes

Hello everyone,

My Dad has been in his care home for 6 weeks now and I feel that there is a lack of activities I would like to try and do something about this and would like to organise some kind of activity for the residents to make their life more interesting, it must be so boring for them doing nothing much every day.

I just wondered if any of you had done anything like this and if so what did you do? The residents are mainly mid to late stage alzheimer's so it's hard to think of anything. My daughter has a very well behaved Labrador and a new puppy so I thought I may ask the home if she could bring them in maybe? but I would really like to organise something else like music or games for them?

I would appreciate any ideas.


Thanks
Claire xx
My friend has been in a residential home for a year. He especially likes going out. I visit him twice a week and take him in his wheel chair to the Library - he likes watching You Tube videos from his era - the local cafe and the pub. He resists joining in activities and I feel is both bored and lonely. I feel he appreciates the one to one care he receives while I'm with him. When I recently arrived he said "this is great."
My friend used to play guitar on the folk club circuit and busk. I'm about to organise a third entertainment afternoon by local folk club performers. I feel that such people from the folk club world would be very willing to attend your father's home and entertain.
It's much easier to make conversation while out than when sitting in the home. Sometimes I sing some of the old songs to him, could I suggest practising by listening to songs on You Tube and singing along to them.
Best wishes.
Peter
 

Kitten71

Registered User
Jul 22, 2013
157
East Yorkshire
My dad is in a nursing home and activities are very few and far between, despite the fancy board advertising all sorts of things. Sensing dad was bored, I had a look online and came across Activities To Share website. They have all sorts of stuff suitable for both men, women, and group activities. Some of the items are pretty expensive but it might give you some ideas at least. I got dad the brightly coloured bean bags. They're made of a soft, chenille type material and he loves them. He seems to like to bury his face in them and sometimes thinks they're edible! :eek: He's not much of a social butterfly and prefers one on one interaction but the bean bags are ideal for when he decides he's going to throw something. How about something like stickle bricks too? The residents might enjoy building a creation out of those. I think big, chunky things are best, so there's less chance of them being mistaken for food and getting eaten! Good luck with the puppy. He sounds lovely :)
 

clairedelacey

Registered User
Dec 15, 2015
22
Northumberland
My friend has been in a residential home for a year. He especially likes going out. I visit him twice a week and take him in his wheel chair to the Library - he likes watching You Tube videos from his era - the local cafe and the pub. He resists joining in activities and I feel is both bored and lonely. I feel he appreciates the one to one care he receives while I'm with him. When I recently arrived he said "this is great."
My friend used to play guitar on the folk club circuit and busk. I'm about to organise a third entertainment afternoon by local folk club performers. I feel that such people from the folk club world would be very willing to attend your father's home and entertain.
It's much easier to make conversation while out than when sitting in the home. Sometimes I sing some of the old songs to him, could I suggest practising by listening to songs on You Tube and singing along to them.
Best wishes.
Thanks for your reply Peter do you know of any fold clubs in my area? I'm in Seahouses Northumberland. x
 

clairedelacey

Registered User
Dec 15, 2015
22
Northumberland
Hi everyone thanks for your replies, My Daughter Megan and I took the puppy in, oh he's called Bear by the way. The residents loved him although my Dad unfortunately wasn't that keen! It was so lovely to see the reaction of a couple of the female residents and Megan spent some time sitting with them and Bear (I had to keep pinching myself to stop myself crying!) Megan has since said she'll come in with Bear once a week as she loved spending time with the residents and putting a smile on their faces, she's only 17 herself so I'm very proud of her. It also turns out that Dad has mentioned Megan to the staff and how lovely he thinks she is! which is great because he has never really spent that much time with her. Thanks again for all of your helpful comments. Claire xx