• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can now be found in our new area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Activities for dad

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
That is a great idea. I am sure my dad could manage that. I cannot believe I have not thought of something as simple as that. Good social activity as well. Thank you ,
 

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
We also watched the Edinburgh tattoo. I wish I had recorded it now !

'Active' equals other difficulties/problems, I know, but I would so like to be able to do active things. TV is usually/often rubbish but certain things animate like animal progs. Worst I find is constant questioning or bringing up irrelevant topic at part of prog where I want to concentrate. Also when you point something out, because cognitive processes slow and sight rock bottom, then thinks it's another person sometimes being not even right sex when Program has moved on.
I shouldn't complain as today is so good and as afternoon the tv was on constantly being watched with closed eyes quite a lot. Edinburgh tattoo is accepted at mo although have been asked if I like it so don't know how long till it's noise. Have got quick reads from library to see if enjoyed when being read to.
Also find vasc. Dem so hard to comprehend as what presents can be so diverse in 'ability'.I believe it is due to path neural connections make. Sometimes I wonder whether it is to do with how congested arteries are and how much oxygen therefore reaches brain. Therefore I'm so careful with diet to ensure that what there is is maintained for as long as possible and try to hide pulses in food whenever pos to help mop up cholesterol.
 

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
This is a great thread, will work my way down it. Currently on a mission to find some dominoes in our house.
Thank you BeckyJan
 

lizzybean

Registered User
Feb 3, 2014
1,366
Lancashire
I bought some from amazon, they are coloured as well so sometimes if MIL is struggling a bit I will say have you got any reds or blues. Helps a bit. (they were £3.99)
 

Tufty

Registered User
Jul 18, 2014
27
Bristol
Scrabble works for my Mum

Sanity saver in evenings with my Mum. Gets us out of ever repeating conversations, reading out the same newspaper story again and asking the same questions about the newspaper story etc etc. So good for me :)

Hits sweet spot with Mum at the moment too since it doesn't require short term memory (near non existent now), but uses her still good mental processes of vocabulary etc. Plus she actually enjoys it.

A common thread with other comments - its something she knew and enjoyed before dementia.

Drawback is that it needs full attention from me. So not a good solution when I want/need to take care of something else.
 

Chook

Registered User
Jun 14, 2013
238
Westcountry
It's so hard isn't it. Mum doesn't live with me but I'm constantly trying to think of activities for her to do when I'm not there. She tells me she's so bored but wont do anything I leave for her. (I see her every day).

She mainly like's watching DVDs and listening to music. We also bought her a budgie which she'll talk to for hours.

I'm sorry that you dad think's that you have a special relationship. I thought I had it tough because mum keeps getting naked in front of me and wont shut the door when doing a poo! That must really make you shudder! Well done for keeping so strong. Just remember it's not him, it's the illness.

Good luck

Chook
x
 

Bevpet

Registered User
Sep 14, 2013
9
Perth Western Australia
my mother keeps occupied

My dad is physically active . He does hoovering. Ironing. I give him brass to clean, but he is continually asking me for things to do. Any ideas of things he can sit and do? Models and jigsaws no good. Something productive. He moans he is bored all the time.
My mother plays solitaire on my desktop computer. When in hospital she plays word find, I buy the books from newsagencys. Bevpet Perth WEST Aust
 

Marigold53

Registered User
Aug 17, 2012
2
My dad is physically active . He does hoovering. Ironing. I give him brass to clean, but he is continually asking me for things to do. Any ideas of things he can sit and do? Models and jigsaws no good. Something productive. He moans he is bored all the time.
Would he enjoy taking things to bits e.g old radios; or sanding furniture e.g wood coffee tables or stools; or building meccano sets?
 

Gezedka

Registered User
Jan 29, 2013
5
Role confusion

My Mum suffers of AD. There are no role confusions, but she once forgot who her older son was and mistook him for his father who she did not fancy much. Since then, I mounted family pictures in her bedroom and living room, and after a calm discussion I let her write down a note to herself with our pictures explaining who's who, where we are, etc.

As for being overactive, I discussed this with her GP who found a way of medication to avoid obsessive behaviour and hallucinations. That helps her being more relaxed and sleep better at night.
 

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
It's so hard isn't it. Mum doesn't live with me but I'm constantly trying to think of activities for her to do when I'm not there. She tells me she's so bored but wont do anything I leave for her. (I see her every day).

She mainly like's watching DVDs and listening to music. We also bought her a budgie which she'll talk to for hours.

I'm sorry that you dad think's that you have a special relationship. I thought I had it tough because mum keeps getting naked in front of me and wont shut the door when doing a poo! That must really make you shudder! Well done for keeping so strong. Just remember it's not him, it's the illness.

Good luck

Chook
x
Thank you a Chook. It is horrible having to hear or see things you would never want to. You wonder where the world as you knew it is going don't you. It changes minute to minute some days.
Glad to be talking to people on here.
X
 

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
Would he enjoy taking things to bits e.g old radios; or sanding furniture e.g wood coffee tables or stools; or building meccano sets?
He would like doing things with wood, but he suffers with arthritis in his hands. As do I. Sanding no good for that. I do get him to polish furniture tho !
 

Mannie

Registered User
Mar 13, 2014
116
Bracknell area
If he was a DIY-er:

Does he have a toolbox ? He could tidy it ? (you could untidy it beforehand as needed......). Sorting nails/screws etc.
Go to the library and pick some DIY manuals, they have lots of pictures...
A trip to the local DIY store to "buy some fixings"
A trip to a timber merchants or building suppliers
Tidying the shed
Tidying the garage
Winding the garden hose
Cleaning the garden tools with WD40
Sharpening the garden tools with carberundum
Painting the shed
Sanding and painting a window ledge

You can repeat such activities since they will be quickly forgotten. You can do the activities in easy stages, which will stretch them out.

Ask the local football/rugby club/indoor bowls whether they have volunteers who will take your dad to a match, my uncle does that.

Ask the local council for their "Dementia Directory" it will contain lists where you can find your dad a buddy to facilitate such activities
 

Cucu Mzungu

Registered User
Nov 11, 2011
63
London
Mum living with me is always asking"what can I do now" I find her little jobs to do around the house: polishing, mopping floor and sometimes tidying and cleaning kitchen cupboards, but the problem is she wants me to do all these things with her or does not comlete and I have to finish things. She did sort out all my books in order, but I had to put them back on shelves, but theres only so much and I've never had such a busy life! My brother has to deal with the spouse thing and it is without doubt the most uncomfortable part of dementia.
YES!!! AN exhausting and frazzling thing - the constant request for activities, and being cross about being bored when you have just done this and that and been out to here and there, and would like your head to yourself for a while... (and I am only at my Mum's some of the time)
 

Cucu Mzungu

Registered User
Nov 11, 2011
63
London
Not to make light of your problems, but I'm envious that you are looking for activities for your 92 year old dad, with dementia! My mam is only 75 and is way beyond being able to entertain herself with any useful (or even non-useful) activity now.

All she does is pace around the house, pulling furniture out, de-making the bed, picking things up and putting them in odd places, and has a fascination with cushions and other soft furnishings. Over and over, hour after hour.

Oh how I'd love it if she could do a bit of dusting, polishing, hoovering, tidying, anything. It would be lovely to see her doing something like that, especially as she was so very houseproud in the past and everything was always immaculate.

I know you have your own set of difficulties and I'm not trivialising them, honestly, but oh I do wish ...
That sounds really really hard. I hope you have some help so that you have quite a bit of time away from your Mum.
 
Last edited:

Denise.w

Registered User
Aug 23, 2014
39
If he was a DIY-er:

Does he have a toolbox ? He could tidy it ? (you could untidy it beforehand as needed......). Sorting nails/screws etc.
Go to the library and pick some DIY manuals, they have lots of pictures...
A trip to the local DIY store to "buy some fixings"
A trip to a timber merchants or building suppliers
Tidying the shed
Tidying the garage
Winding the garden hose
Cleaning the garden tools with WD40
Sharpening the garden tools with carberundum
Painting the shed
Sanding and painting a window ledge

You can repeat such activities since they will be quickly forgotten. You can do the activities in easy stages, which will stretch them out.

Ask the local football/rugby club/indoor bowls whether they have volunteers who will take your dad to a match, my uncle does that.

Ask the local council for their "Dementia Directory" it will contain lists where you can find your dad a buddy to facilitate such activities
Thanks Mannie, great suggestions. I have never heard of the Dementia Directory. Is it on paper or on line please ?
 

Forum statistics

Threads
115,434
Messages
1,688,775
Members
66,360
Latest member
Schuyler43