AA in care homes

pammy14

Registered User
Dec 5, 2005
103
leicestershire
Can anyone tell me if you are allowed to keep on claiming AA when you go into a care home. My sister has the higher rate which makes her pension up to about£200.00 which will pay nearly half the care home fees if she can keep the AA.

Thanks

pam
 

janices666

Registered User
Jun 23, 2006
19
Kent
Care home.

Hi Pam.
I am very sorry but unfortunately you will not be able to carry on claiming AA when your husband goes into a care home. Last year my husband went into a care home and my AA stopped. Sorry that it is not good news, best of luck anyway.
Janice.
 

Kayla

Registered User
May 14, 2006
621
Kent
My Mum had been claiming the lower rate of AA for many years before she went into a care home, due to her rheumatoid arthritis. The SW thought she should be eligible for the higher rate, when she began to have hallucinations and started phoning us at night and in the early hours of the morning. We did claim, but were refused at first and then eventually, after Mum was moved into the nursing home, we sucessfully claimed the higher rate for her.
Mum is self-funding, but receives (or should receive) the medium rate nursing care contribution and the higher rate attendance allowance. Basically she is paying for most of her NH fees herself, and also quite a bit of income tax on her pensions. She is still waiting for 5 months of RNCC and the Income Tax people think she may have over paid her tax, but we've not heard yet.(They phoned us about it)
Sometimes I feel that the system is there to make life as difficult as possible for us.
Still, on a brighter note, Mum's new tennants have the key and are moving in next week, so she has a little extra income towards her NH fees.
Kayla
 

Amy

Registered User
Jan 4, 2006
3,453
Hiya Pammy,
Just confirmed with my dad that mum is still in receipt of AA, even though in a NH.
Love Helen
 

Áine

Registered User
Feb 22, 2006
994
sort of north east ish
Because dad is self-funding I was told that he could claim AA when he went into nursing home. Then when I phoned up to see why the claim was taking so long, the woman said to me that he would not be eligible for AA because he was having the nursing component of his fees paid. Then I got a letter saying that he'd been awarded higher rate of AA. Now I don't quite know what to think :confused: They'll probably write again next week and say he's got to pay it back.
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
I don't think there is a yes or no answer. My understanding is that if the resident is fully funded by the local authority then they do lose their AA but if they are self funded then they keep it. I am not sure of the position if you are partly local authority funded and partly self funded. I think that there is a period of time when a person first goes into residential care when things are different, in case it ends up only being a temporary placement.

This has been a hard week for various reasons and I have had a couple of glasses of wine so please don't quote me!
 

PatH

Registered User
Feb 14, 2005
301
77
N.Ireland
My thanks also Norman.
As my husband was entitled to full DLA for life before going into hospital I think we should now be entitled to the MOB Component once his part funding comes through for his NH.
I wouldnt have done anything about it had I not read pams post and your reply.
Pat
 

pammy14

Registered User
Dec 5, 2005
103
leicestershire
Thanks everyone. Looking at that site it seems that AA will continue as she will be self funding until her money runs out. At least that will make it last a bit longer.

Pam