1. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    136
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    My wife (PWD) was recently seen by the local nursing home which specialises in dementia. To my surprise, they said she was too far advanced and would need a more specialised unit which is about forty miles away. This was a complete shock, as to me she is still my wife and I don't think she is difficult to look after.
    I guess when you live with it day to day, you miss the signs that things are generally getting worse.

    Oh well, life go on!
     
  2. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    339
    i had exactly the same sequence of experiences with my husband a few weeks ago. I moved him last week into a specialist unit about 40 miles away ...... so far he seems to have made the transition fairly easily (fingers tightly crossed). At the moment I plan to visit twice a week and I am lucky to have other friends, relations and ex-carers visiting near daily as he settles. Only since he has gone do I begin to realise how many accommodations I had made for him - how stressed I was - and how 'fragile' the whole situation was becoming.
     
  3. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    136
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    @Sarahdun
    It is all new to new! What is the difference you see in a specialist unit against a normal nursing home?
     
  4. Helly68

    Helly68 Registered User

    Mar 12, 2018
    368
    Alex54 - I think the differences I saw, from the residential bit of my Mum's home to the dementia unit were -

    Increased security. The unit is locked for everyone's safety and residents sadly cannot wander (many can't anyway) for their own and others safety.

    Rooms may have a wet room rather than bathroom and be set up for hoisting etc

    Activities tend to be simpler - often almost everyone is asleep in the afternoons.

    Hopefully a better staff to resident ratio - sadly not always the case but it should be.

    My Mum has found the unit to be a calmer environment with an emphasis on safety and comforting routine.
     
  5. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    339
    Advantages for me included: a better staff to resident ratio and more specialist trained staff, accommodation of distinctive dementia behaviours in both the design and management of the space (eg wandering into other people's rooms, picking things up that don't belong to them, mistaking and confusing people, not knowing the time etc etc), a locked door policy, more activities geared to needs, space to walk uninterrupted, secure outside space).

    I have learnt that there are many different kinds of residential homes and many different kinds of dementia units - it was trial and error until I found the right one for us. Ordinary residential homes could not cope with - or indeed even understand - these typical dementia behaviours. One even accused my husband of stealing!!! It was also not fair on the other residents many of whom were mentally fine but physically very frail.
     

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