1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. KIM62

    KIM62 Registered User

    Apr 12, 2008
    51
    Yorkshire
    #1 KIM62, Apr 12, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2008
    First I would like to say a big Thank you to all of you who helped me with advice last year.

    Early last year my husband and I were experiencing problems with his sister. She was having memory problems,which were becoming serious to her own safety, she resided on her own.
    Anyway, after she had a brain scan, the psychiatric doctor diagnosed it was just a part of 'Old Age', she is 72.
    Of course, what we were witnessing told us different.
    I then came onto this website, and, after telling all, quite a few people provided sound advice on the forum.
    My husband and I went back to the doctor, who then attended to my sister-in-law again, and she was diagnosed with VASCULAR DEMENTIA.
    Her physical appearance has declined rapidly since last July. She now resides in full time residential care (since Dec 07) in a small home, so she gets the personal attention she likes.
    A lot of positive things have come out of all this.
    Sadly, the downside is she has to privately fund herself from savings, and eventually sale of home, that can't be helped.
    The main concern is now she gets all the help and dignity that she deserves.
    Next week is her 73rd birthday, and Im making sure she has a few bottles to celebrate.
    She is still mobile, although a bit doddery on her feet, and, with help to make sure she gets to the toilet ok, she can just about manage.
    We have our moments of conversation interupted by some memory lapse.
    But, we feel we would not be at this stage if not in full time care, we can now concentrate on visiting her and having chatty talks and happier visits.
    Whereby, she was at home and we were becoming slowly full time carers. We were only two working a 24 hour shift. I do have more to say on this subject, but thats for another thread.
    I just want to once again say a BIG THANK YOU FOR ALL THE ADVICE I RECEIVED FROM THIS FORUM:D
     
  2. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Kim, thank you so much for the update on your sister-in-law.

    You seem to have found somewhere good, where she is still getting a reasonable quality to her life. So glad that you are making plans for the forthcoming birthday. I am sure it will be appreciated.

    So good to receive a positive post in this uncertain world. Glad you found this site to be of help.

    That is the most positive thing we can do. Help and support one and other. Take care now.
     
  3. KIM62

    KIM62 Registered User

    Apr 12, 2008
    51
    Yorkshire
    Connie,
    Thank you for your kind words. I, and my husband, always try to do our best.
    I even organized for her own wheelchair,to be left in her room, to encourage other visitors to take her out for a stroll. Its much better than sitting, and her nodding off while visiting. She was adamant that she would not sit in the chair, I assured her she did not have to,only if she felt tired, or she could push me if I did.
    Eventually, she did relent and allowed to be pushed...which was fine. I find not to push her into anything, suggestion can also allow them to still make decisions, and feel as if in some control of their life.
    Im now going to post a new thread, as I have been given a challenge on behalf of my sister-in-law
     

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