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CaPattinson

Registered User
May 19, 2010
11,730
0
West Yorks
What does cache mean after a web address, please?

following on from computing for dummies, if one sees an image that has a website under it (where it is situated presumably) and it says cache or cached? does that mean its private and nothing can be used? Really want to get it right. :( Thanks Chris Changed title here ut not changed on forum page?
 
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Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
64,211
0
69
Dundee
I think that cached means that you have already opened this and it is stored or cached somewhere on your system already. No doubt that's a lot of mince I've just spoken - happy to be proved wrong!! Izzy x
 

JPG1

Account Closed
Jul 16, 2008
3,391
0
Thanks Karen unfortunately I'm no wiser except it appears not to be anything to do with copy right! :(:) Chris

It is nothing to do with copyright, Chris, so if copyright is your main concern, then don't clog your head up with 'cache'.

The 'cache' is the equivalent of a 'secret store of information but not necessarily required at the moment, but speeded up for future access' information.

Nothing to do with copyright at all.

Hope that helps.
 

Sandy

Registered User
Mar 23, 2005
6,847
0
Ummmm...I'm not aware of any connection between cache and copyright (other than the fact that they both start with C).

Cache memory is something a PC might use when accessing the Internet or by an Internet Service Provider (ISP) supplying pages to requesting PC's.

All it means is calling up a version that has been cached, or stored, in memory rather than requesting a 'fresh' copy from the computer that actually provides that web page to the Internet.

So for a popular page, say like the BBC homepage, an ISP may have a cache copy that it refreshes every minute or so and then it can provide that page to it's users directly, rather than making thousands of requests for the same BBC home page every minute.

So I can't think of any connection to do with copyright BUT it's possible that some search engines such as Google may have stored images (cached them) and the actual original web page itself has vanished from the Internet, so only the cached copy remains - like an archive copy.

But I still don't think that would affect copyright status as copyright in the UK persists for 70 years after creation - so would still exist in law even if the page (and company that created it) disappeared.

Take care,
 

CaPattinson

Registered User
May 19, 2010
11,730
0
West Yorks
Cache

Hi Sandy, thanks for taking the time to reply to my question. I believe I was 'over complicating' the copyright issue in my mind. I feel I have wasted your time, my apologies :eek: Chris
 
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