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  1. #1
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    Nov 2016
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    Driving with altzheimers

    An elderly member of my family has been diagnosed with mild altzheimers and has benn put on medication. We know she should contact the DVLA, but she dosnt like the idea of losing her licence and blames me for making her go to the doctors. she dosnt think she has a problem. She lives on her own and i am not her carer, she hasnt got and wont have one, but should i contact the DVLA or try and coax her to, as i dont want to see her get into trouble.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    11,526
    A diagnosis of dementia does not mean that a person is incapable of driving.

    Is the diagnosis dementia or MCI?

    The person diagnosed should contact the DVLA and their insurers.
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/info/2...t/27/driving/2

    Anybody can anonymously report their concerns to the DVLA

    https://emaildvla.direct.gov.uk/emai...rs_med_03.html

    Are you able to contact the GP?
    (S)he will not be able to discuss details but could well give 'general advice'

  3. #3
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    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    10

    how is her driving?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerbread View Post
    An elderly member of my family has been diagnosed with mild altzheimers and has benn put on medication. We know she should contact the DVLA, but she dosnt like the idea of losing her licence and blames me for making her go to the doctors. she dosnt think she has a problem. She lives on her own and i am not her carer, she hasnt got and wont have one, but should i contact the DVLA or try and coax her to, as i dont want to see her get into trouble.
    My mum was never the best of drivers and continued to drive very short distances when she had mild dementia. She then would just go to the supermarket on a Sunday morning and park in the car park before the store opened. Fortunately, one day when the car was parked outside her house (no-one in it) a lorry drove into it and it was a right-off. It was awful for my mum to lose her independence but a relief for me. The problem with people who have dementia, in my experience, is their lack of awareness. If you are worried perhaps you could either talk to her doctor in confidence or the DVLA. Imagine if a child ran out in front of the car and your relative was unable to react quickly enough. This is what I said to my mum and that prompted her to only drive on Sunday morning when very few cars were on the road.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    399
    I had this problem with Dad hoping that someone would intervene and get Dad off the road. The hospital had already asked him not to drive anymore. Sadly I realised it was down to me. As close relative you know better than anyone else when you start to have concerns. In the end I had a row with Dad and we never ever argue. I frogmarched him to GP and had fantastic supportive GP who tested Dad and explained in no uncertain terms why he shouldn't be driving anymore. I wrote to DVLA , Insurer and re registered car to me. It was soon forgotten by all. If Dad had carried on driving and killed a little girl it would not have been such a happy ending. It is down to you to stop it when you feel it is unsafe however best way you see fit. I would suggest a phone call to GP and asking for support first before making appointment.
    Good Luck

  5. #5
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    Jan 2014
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    As nitram has said, if there is a diagnosis it is notifiable to DVLA and the insurance co.

    We only fully realised my mum had dementia when she got lost on the way from her house to mine, she missed the M6 turn off the M1 and ended up in Derby. I suspect she nearly went the wrong way down a dual carriageway in Derby because over the next few days she kept repeating that she wouldn't have driven the wrong way down the dual carriageway. Needless to say once we had rescued her (and her car a few days later - it wasn't actually insured - long story - xmas was in the middle) I never let her near the car keys again.

    6 months before this I was very worried by her driving and took her for an eyetest, which she passed with the glasses she used for driving.

    What I hadn't realised was her spatial awareness wasn't working anymore, and hadn't been for some time, hindsight is a wonderful thing. We had watched her cross the road without appearing to see cars and that is why.

    With hindsight my mum had diagnosable Alzheimer's at least 4 years before the crisis hit, and for the first 2 of those years she was safe to drive, but the second 2 years she wasn't. The crisis that hit was quite big (state of house due to hoarding - we never let her go back etc) but the thing that kept me awake on and off for months was the fact I had let her drive with my children in the car when she wasn't safe to do so (and in fact wasn't even insured - yes there was court action in progress on that as well).

    If you are concerned your PWD isn't safe to drive, please stop them driving any way you can. As others have said you wouldn't want them to injure a child.

    There are assessment centres and if they pass the test then they can carry on driving. Many safely do in the early stages.

    There are many driving threads on here, and DVLA and GPs are sometimes helpful and sometimes not.

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