Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23
  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Shedrech View Post
    hello Jorjix
    Kevinl has written eloquently on the unpredictability of those with dementia, and I do agree
    that said, it is hard to diagnose dementia (especially given the various types and those much less often recognised early on)
    I'm wondering whether your ideas might be able to help in the diagnostic process
    I think I read that there is some kind of system to look at the movement of those with Parkinson's, which picks up certain early key changes
    might your work build up a body of evidence on movement and behaviour to help diagnosis, in some way ...
    just a thought
    Shedrech, thanks for your suggestions.
    I thought about trying to early diagnose dementia. I think it's a good idea that might actually be a bit easier to implement, however, I started thinking of it's value and impact for patients & their families.
    Would this be useful? Would it be interesting to, say, find out 2 years earlier than it's currently possible that one has dementia?

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by carpe diem View Post
    Hi. I've used a lot of great tech. I think your idea is good in theory but who is going to respond to the alerts. I live 4 hours away from my mum so I can't have any false alarms.
    A system which detects something has already happened is of little use. Preventing falls or systems which don't allow the cooker to be left on or the sink to overflow are all available.
    There's little point shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted.
    I don't like to be negative but prevention is better than just alerts.
    I totally agree and I'm currently imagining crazy ideas for closing the loop and preventing falls. I can't believe that, with so much technology going on (we're envisaging having holidays on the moon!) and falls being such a huge problem, nobody found a way to solve it.

    To answer your question, I don't think the solution is to send an alarm saying "your mum is going to fall in the next 5 mins", but to try to understand changes in behaviour and assess risk on a daily/weekly basis.

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    36
    That system has potential but still requires a person at the end of the camera to interpret the behaviours.

    There is power if one person could easily monitor 30 individuals and therefore appropriately interact with the family as well.

    Privacy is a big issue but it seems impossible to have both safety and privacy unless we incorporate the technology of infrared cameras.

    I have always thought that such systems could be outsourced for monitoring to other parts of the world in order reduce risk of abuse.

  4. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by philamillan View Post
    That system has potential but still requires a person at the end of the camera to interpret the behaviours.

    There is power if one person could easily monitor 30 individuals and therefore appropriately interact with the family as well.

    Privacy is a big issue but it seems impossible to have both safety and privacy unless we incorporate the technology of infrared cameras.

    I have always thought that such systems could be outsourced for monitoring to other parts of the world in order reduce risk of abuse.
    Ideally, the system wouldn't require a person looking at the videos, if it made accurate recommendations; but I agree, we're not there yet.

    Personally, I think that the idea of infrared cameras is very clever: it's less invasive and it still offers the required information for making the analysis.
    Another idea I'm investigating is around extracting the silhouette of the patient and throwing away the real video, together with integrating motion/radio sensors in the rooms where people are less likely to install cameras (such as the bathroom and the bedroom).

    I really like the idea of outsourcing monitoring in order to filter false alarms!

  5. #20
    New User
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    2

    houdini

    Hi, I think where a monitoring system could be useful is in the situation our family is in where a relative has just had a diagnosis of AZ and is currently living independently with daily visits from friends and family. What is hard for us to judge is the point where more support is needed - overnight stays or 24 hour care. A system of monitoring could be useful - deciding what is monitored is the challenge. While we're on tech I would love to be able to monitor my relatives fluid intake (and urine output) - fairly convinced that they never drink water and so are often mildly dehydrated thus risking kidney and bladder problems.

    I think monitoring should stop where we would all stop if actually present - this could be different places for different people but for most would be OK to know someone had got into bed or out of bed, or gone into bathroom, but not to go any further than that.

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by houdini View Post
    While we're on tech I would love to be able to monitor my relatives fluid intake (and urine output) - fairly convinced that they never drink water and so are often mildly dehydrated thus risking kidney and bladder problems.

    I think monitoring should stop where we would all stop if actually present - this could be different places for different people but for most would be OK to know someone had got into bed or out of bed, or gone into bathroom, but not to go any further than that.
    That would be very interesting, Houdini, we haven't thought of dehydration. It's relatively easy to track using video monitoring, as well as being an important metric and a starting point for different affections.

    I agree that people should be able to stop the cameras whenever they want and also be free to configure the system according to their needs.

    To move our project forward and further investigate what people think about video monitoring for preventive medicine we created a website. Please have a look if you have 1 minute and it would be very useful to get your feedback: http://machinemedicine.com/

    Thanks again!

  7. #22
    Registered User Kevinl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Salford
    Posts
    3,481
    Well, man trips over dog lead, on TV You've Been Framed pays £250 for a clip like that but I can see nothing other than a box (possibly added later) to indicate the fall risk. The dog walked in front of him and he tripped over the lead, happens in the park everyday, he was distracted with whatever was in his hand keys or something took his eye off the ball. A younger person may not fallen having better reflexes, but I see younger people do a similar thing when they're walking the dog and texting.
    K
    If you're going through hell, keep going

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinl View Post
    Well, man trips over dog lead, on TV You've Been Framed pays £250 for a clip like that but I can see nothing other than a box (possibly added later) to indicate the fall risk.
    K
    The video was filmed in a hospital in Canada. In this particular example, the falls prevention system is looking at walking patterns (gait speed, stride length, pose, centre of balance...), comparing them to what's expected and notifying staff when there's a high risk or when it detects a fall. The example video might not be the best because there's not much time to alert somebody and the man falling is with a relative who can help him get up or alert the medical staff. That's a useful callout and I might look into changing it with a better scenario.

    Needless to say that this, as you very well observed, is not a product, but merely an algorithm that shows how an artificial intelligence system can indeed follow people the same way the human eye would and infer complex events from simple CCTV.
    The hard part for us now is to imagine what type of metrics we can capture in order to help carers, medical staff and the patients themselves.

    In your opinion, what do you expect to see extracted from the video data in order for the proposal to make a compelling case? Maybe displaying the mobility metrics we're computing, along with the box and the falls detection message?
    Any suggestion is highly appreciated.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •