Waking care

Littleanna

Registered User
Feb 12, 2024
14
0
I’ve posted before about my dad sundowning most of the night, he lives in his own with 4 x day carers but essentially he needs help at night. He takes off his pad once the carer leaves and consequently the bed is wet every night, I have literally everything waterproof but he’s taken to removing that as well. He mops himself up with clothing so the washing daily is untenable.
Social services won’t help with waking care and we can’t afford what the care agency charges as he has no savings. He owns his own flat so I was wondering if SS would consider putting a charge on his flat just like they would if he was in a care home. Has anyone had similar?
What can I do ? I’m at a loss as to how to manage this issue … is private care cheaper? Seems like going into a home is the only option and there is no guarantee they would manage him there! He’s no problem at all during the day
 

Sonya1

Registered User
Nov 26, 2022
234
0
As I understand it, the property is disregarded when assessing financial status if care is being given at home. Local authorities won't be likely to fund waking night care as this is likely to cost them around £250 per night - so if they assessed him as having that need, they would probably suggest a care home (and take the assets of his estate before helping with funding) Social Services do have a duty of care to your Dad and I dare suggest that you step back for a couple of days and leave the day carers to deal with the results of his night time activities - that way there will be 'proof' of his night time needs. Very difficult to actually do of course. The right nursing/residential home would be able to manage his needs and it will be quite par for the course for many f them. Would you maybe consider sending your Dad for a weeks 'holiday' or respite to a care home so that they can evaluate him as well?
I'm really just thinking out loud so please feel free to ignore any of my ideas!
 

maisiecat

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
436
0
Hi @Littleanna , one of the reasons my husband is in a Nursing Home is due to his night time behaviour. I was told they would never fund the waking night carers as he would still need a daytime care package and it would be almost double the price of a Nursing home.
You will need the right home as my husband was turned down by loads as the staff levels are lower at night and its more difficult to manage a wakeful resident.
Sadly you cannot sedate this type of behaviour out, its a phase of their disease. I agree with @Sonya1 that respite might help Social services look at his actual needs as they seem to disregard family information.
 

Jools1402

Registered User
Jan 13, 2024
179
0
My MIL ended up in a care home (and really liked it and flourished there actually) because of her night time wakefulness - and she wanted FIL to be up with her too - poor man. She was more than manageable during the day. Social services would not countenance paying for overnight care in her own home and would not consider a care home place until a "full package" of 4 x carer visits per day was shown not to be working. The fact that 4 care visits a day was not going to solve the problem didn't matter - they had their protocol to follow.
 

Littleanna

Registered User
Feb 12, 2024
14
0
My MIL ended up in a care home (and really liked it and flourished there actually) because of her night time wakefulness - and she wanted FIL to be up with her too - poor man. She was more than manageable during the day. Social services would not countenance paying for overnight care in her own home and would not consider a care home place until a "full package" of 4 x carer visits per day was shown not to be working. The fact that 4 care visits a day was not going to solve the problem didn't matter - they had their protocol to follow.
It’s so difficult isn’t it as my dads ‘last visit’ is pointless as all the carers do is change his pad, this would work if he remained in bed but he could be up 5 mins after they leave to start his night time wandering and he removes the pad
 

Littleanna

Registered User
Feb 12, 2024
14
0
As I understand it, the property is disregarded when assessing financial status if care is being given at home. Local authorities won't be likely to fund waking night care as this is likely to cost them around £250 per night - so if they assessed him as having that need, they would probably suggest a care home (and take the assets of his estate before helping with funding) Social Services do have a duty of care to your Dad and I dare suggest that you step back for a couple of days and leave the day carers to deal with the results of his night time activities - that way there will be 'proof' of his night time needs. Very difficult to actually do of course. The right nursing/residential home would be able to manage his needs and it will be quite par for the course for many f them. Would you maybe consider sending your Dad for a weeks 'holiday' or respite to a care home so that they can evaluate him as well?
I'm really just thinking out loud so please feel free to ignore any of my ideas!
I think part of the problem with me is because my dad is easily managed during the daytime I sort of feel he isn’t ready for a care home but his nighttime confusion, wandering ( thankfully not out of the property) and incontinence is just so very very tiring, my biggest fear is making the decision to place him in care and then they don’t manage his incontinence either and he’s wandering around in wet clothes
 

Littleanna

Registered User
Feb 12, 2024
14
0
As I understand it, the property is disregarded when assessing financial status if care is being given at home. Local authorities won't be likely to fund waking night care as this is likely to cost them around £250 per night - so if they assessed him as having that need, they would probably suggest a care home (and take the assets of his estate before helping with funding) Social Services do have a duty of care to your Dad and I dare suggest that you step back for a couple of days and leave the day carers to deal with the results of his night time activities - that way there will be 'proof' of his night time needs. Very difficult to actually do of course. The right nursing/residential home would be able to manage his needs and it will be quite par for the course for many f them. Would you maybe consider sending your Dad for a weeks 'holiday' or respite to a care home so that they can evaluate him as well?
I'm really just thinking out loud so please feel free to ignore any of my ideas!
I am thinking of trying respite whilst I’m on holiday although the care home suggested I should be around but I’m also trying to put this off ad I’m worried that it may make him more confused when he returns home? I wanted to use respite as a last resort and then maybe leave him there if it works.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
25,464
0
South coast
Hello @Littleanna

You should be able to find a care home that can deal with his night time wandering and also with his incontinence, although it will probably have to be a dementia unit/home. Any place you are considering, you need to tell them about this to make sure they can deal with it.

Respite is intended to be just that - to give the carer a break, not just as a last resort, although the fact that you are posting on here says to me that you are getting pretty desperate. Not being able to sleep at night is most carers line in the sand
 

annieka 56

Registered User
Aug 8, 2022
372
0
I am thinking of trying respite whilst I’m on holiday although the care home suggested I should be around but I’m also trying to put this off ad I’m worried that it may make him more confused when he returns home? I wanted to use respite as a last resort and then maybe leave him there if it works.
I think you should use respite when you absolutely need a break which is probably now.
My husband had an amazing 4 weeks respite Jan/Feb and I firmly believe they sustained it for my sake as I was visibly at tipping point. I and our 2 sons alternated visits and the senior carer told my sons every time to look after me because she was concerned for my health...
I didn't see any residents wandering around in wet clothes and I think managing incontinence was just routine. He was however very challenging there ( which he was and is at home) and when the 4 weeks was up they wouldn't extend it by a week while a permanent place was being sought. So there was no possibility of leaving him there nor of him returning as his needs were too high.
 

TMH

Registered User
Nov 21, 2022
30
0
It’s so difficult isn’t it as my dads ‘last visit’ is pointless as all the carers do is change his pad, this would work if he remained in bed but he could be up 5 mins after they leave to start his night time wandering and he removes the pad
I agree with what the others are saying. It sounds like it's time for a care home. What's his behaviour like through the night? My dad has just decided that he doesn't need to sleep at night now but luckily he's happy to just wander about his room or go downstairs on his stairlift and sleep in his chair so I can still manage to get a decent amount of sleep. If it was any different I wouldn't be able to cope as I work through the day x