Extremely Violent behaviour

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
Hi everyone, new poster and trying to understand Dad’s (69) progression better.
Until recently (3 months) we’d had suspicions that Dad was showing early signs of dementia but it was slow moving and he was able to look after himself (he lives alone). We were watchful and he even registered his own concerns with us (son and daughter).
Following a dizzy spell, he took himself to hospital who diagnosed him with some tiny bleeding on the brain which dissipated naturally within a couple of hours. He must have banged his head at some point.
However, the longer he spent in hospital, the worse his behaviour became and he was eventually moved to the acute injury ward, where he stayed for 70 (!) days. During that time there were multiple instances of escape attempts and physicality which increased in ferocity. A working diagnosis of LBD was determined.
The hospital tweaked his medication and he was finally given leave to join a care home on an assessment basis. Only one care home in the whole county were willing to take him due to the violence displayed.
At the care home, things deteriorated even further within two weeks. Following a successful escape (no blame to the home, he’s a large, powerful man) he ran 5km at full speed and assaulted multiple members of the public before being sequestered by the police and returned to the home. I should mention he’s not run in 25 years but somehow managed to outrun two men in their 20s on pure adrenalin.
The following day I was called to the home to assist in deescalation but, unfortunately, he attacked me with scissors (concealed until then) and a metal pipe he’d broken off his bed’s legs. No injuries thankfully but there was firm intent to maim if I had not moved fast enough.
Section 2 has followed and he is 3 days into his stay at the mental health hospital.
So far, my sister and I have received 6 calls highlighting ongoing, extreme bouts of violence against staff and other patients. And I’m probably underplaying it but the violence has included strangling and using weapons. It’s ferocious and full of intent. As a result he is now on seclusion and sedated. The staff have flagged that sometimes even the sedation is not bringing him down, such is the level of adrenaline going on.
It will doubtless surprise no one that dad was never a violent person pre-LBD and this is all very out of character. I get the impression that the hospital are also taken aback by the sheer energy of it all.
My question is whether anyone has seen this level of continuous ferocity and how long it lasted? Medically, I don’t know how long his body can last being this much on edge 24/7.
And at the heart of it, he’s petrified.
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
2,145
0
Hello @Cassadaga. I have no experience of this level of aggression but I just wanted to respond to your post as it sounds a desperate situation. Thank goodness he has now been sectioned as he is clearly not safe to be at home or in a standard care home. There may be something else going on apart from the dementia. I think that the hospital will find the correct medication to keep him calm but it may take a while. It's early days.

I'm so sorry that you're going through this.
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
Thanks V, we have some suspicions that there may be something else at play too. The vividness of his delusions, which are generally horrific in nature (dead bodies or murders or worse) make me wonder about other disorders which sometimes accompany dementia. Certainly the rapidity of decline is mind boggling.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,968
0
Hello @Cassadaga and welcome to the forum. I have never heard of this level of aggression before but just wanted to give you some support. I am so sorry that you are going through this, it must be so frightening and worrying. And it must be so scary for your dad also. Hopefully now that he has been sectioned the hospital will find some medication regime that will help but it could take some time.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,968
0
Thanks V, we have some suspicions that there may be something else at play too. The vividness of his delusions, which are generally horrific in nature (dead bodies or murders or worse) make me wonder about other disorders which sometimes accompany dementia. Certainly the rapidity of decline is mind boggling.
Delusions and very frightening dreams are quite common in LBD, and could be a part of what is going on, your dad could believe that he is fighting for his life when he has these episodes.
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
Hello @Cassadaga and welcome to the forum. I have never heard of this level of aggression before but just wanted to give you some support. I am so sorry that you are going through this, it must be so frightening and worrying. And it must be so scary for your dad also. Hopefully now that he has been sectioned the hospital will find some medication regime that will help but it could take some time.
Thanks @SeaSwallow. Really appreciate your response. It’s definitely been the hardest week of my life so far!
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
Delusions and very frightening dreams are quite common in LBD, and could be a part of what is going on, your dad could believe that he is fighting for his life when he has these episodes.
Can confirm this, he is in mortal fear that he is being attacked. I am supposedly the ringleader too and the main focus of his ire. We had a good relationship before all this, for context.
The only thing which threw me is that, when I entered his room at the home, he had various weapons lined up on his bed and said “now I’ve got you”. It was quite premeditated and fairly terrifying.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,968
0
Thanks @SeaSwallow. Really appreciate your response. It’s definitely been the hardest week of my life so far!
My husband has LBD so I have had some experience of the frightening dreams that he has, but I have never had to face what you and your dad are experiencing.
Please keep posting even if you just want to talk about how you are feeling, it is what we are here for.
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
My husband has LBD so I have had some experience of the frightening dreams that he has, but I have never had to face what you and your dad are experiencing.
Please keep posting even if you just want to talk about how you are feeling, it is what we are here for.
Thanks again @SeaSwallow . Will keep posting. Can’t see a situation where there won’t be counselling down the line. Lots of memories I’d rather not have.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,968
0
Can confirm this, he is in mortal fear that he is being attacked. I am supposedly the ringleader too and the main focus of his ire. We had a good relationship before all this, for context.
The only thing which threw me is that, when I entered his room at the home, he had various weapons lined up on his bed and said “now I’ve got you”. It was quite premeditated and fairly terrifying.
Oh, I am so sorry to read this, I am sure that if your dad was not going through this episode he would be truly horrified by his behaviour.
 

SeaSwallow

Volunteer Moderator
Oct 28, 2019
6,968
0
Thanks again @SeaSwallow . Will keep posting. Can’t see a situation where there won’t be counselling down the line. Lots of memories I’d rather not have.
We keep cross posting, but yes counselling might be a good idea. A number of our members have gone down that route.
 

PammieA

Registered User
Jan 17, 2024
82
0
Can confirm this, he is in mortal fear that he is being attacked. I am supposedly the ringleader too and the main focus of his ire. We had a good relationship before all this, for context.
The only thing which threw me is that, when I entered his room at the home, he had various weapons lined up on his bed and said “now I’ve got you”. It was quite premeditated and fairly terrifying.
What a terrifying, sad situation you are experiencing. Thank you for sharing, I hope you feel supportive on this forum.
Even if you just share what's happening, just by writing it can help.
Have you got some support from your wider family, or friends too?
Your Dad is getting the medical attention he requires now, I hope he soon becomes more settled.
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
What a terrifying, sad situation you are experiencing. Thank you for sharing, I hope you feel supportive on this forum.
Even if you just share what's happening, just by writing it can help.
Have you got some support from your wider family, or friends too?
Your Dad is getting the medical attention he requires now, I hope he soon becomes more settled.
Thanks @PammieA . Have support from family and friends. And despite putting on a show, the wife intuitively sees through it and has been great. In that regard we all kind of pull together, thankfully.
 

PammieA

Registered User
Jan 17, 2024
82
0
That's so good to hear, and your wife sounds extremely supportive. We all need a good support system.
 

Cassadaga

New member
May 6, 2024
7
0
Just a bit of an update. Dad was eventually sectioned under S2 MHA and then transferred to S.3 after a fairly short time. Unfortunately the violence was more or less continuous which meant he has been sedated and even anaesthetised at times (when the IM injections weren’t working). The consultant psychiatrist at the hospital has informed us that they get patients like this once every 5 or 6 years and the prognosis can be anything between 72 hours and 2 years. His capacity and ability to form coherent sentences is now entirely gone and he seems to live in constant fear and anger with 2 to 1 supervision 24hrs a day. On the flip side, I acknowledge he’s in the right place now
 

SAP

Registered User
Feb 18, 2017
1,673
0
@Cassadaga , thank you for the update at what must be a very stressful time for your family. My mum was sectioned (2 then3) due to violent behaviour that she would never have done before, she hit and pushed staff over and went for other residents. This behaviour continued in hospital. Afterwards I felt like I had been on a spin cycle, I was exhausted. It takes some time to process all of this but as you say he is now safe and being cared for.
 

Scarlet Lady

Registered User
Apr 6, 2021
605
0
@Cassadaga , I’m so, so sorry for what your family is going through. Dementia of any type is immensely cruel, but what your dad is experiencing is extreme and not what most of us would expect to deal with.
Your poor dad- to live in his reality when there seems little anyone can do to relieve his torture is unimaginable. If he cannot be helped, then let’s hope his journey may end quickly.
 

Kristo

Registered User
Apr 10, 2023
137
0
Just catching up on the forum and read this thread, hope your dad is more settled now and that you are able to begin processing everything that has been happening. Your poor dad (and you), it must be like living in a horror movie. I hate this disease. Stay well x
 

Glengormley

New member
Jun 9, 2024
3
0
Hi everyone, new poster and trying to understand Dad’s (69) progression better.
Until recently (3 months) we’d had suspicions that Dad was showing early signs of dementia but it was slow moving and he was able to look after himself (he lives alone). We were watchful and he even registered his own concerns with us (son and daughter).
Following a dizzy spell, he took himself to hospital who diagnosed him with some tiny bleeding on the brain which dissipated naturally within a couple of hours. He must have banged his head at some point.
However, the longer he spent in hospital, the worse his behaviour became and he was eventually moved to the acute injury ward, where he stayed for 70 (!) days. During that time there were multiple instances of escape attempts and physicality which increased in ferocity. A working diagnosis of LBD was determined.
The hospital tweaked his medication and he was finally given leave to join a care home on an assessment basis. Only one care home in the whole county were willing to take him due to the violence displayed.
At the care home, things deteriorated even further within two weeks. Following a successful escape (no blame to the home, he’s a large, powerful man) he ran 5km at full speed and assaulted multiple members of the public before being sequestered by the police and returned to the home. I should mention he’s not run in 25 years but somehow managed to outrun two men in their 20s on pure adrenalin.
The following day I was called to the home to assist in deescalation but, unfortunately, he attacked me with scissors (concealed until then) and a metal pipe he’d broken off his bed’s legs. No injuries thankfully but there was firm intent to maim if I had not moved fast enough.
Section 2 has followed and he is 3 days into his stay at the mental health hospital.
So far, my sister and I have received 6 calls highlighting ongoing, extreme bouts of violence against staff and other patients. And I’m probably underplaying it but the violence has included strangling and using weapons. It’s ferocious and full of intent. As a result he is now on seclusion and sedated. The staff have flagged that sometimes even the sedation is not bringing him down, such is the level of adrenaline going on.
It will doubtless surprise no one that dad was never a violent person pre-LBD and this is all very out of character. I get the impression that the hospital are also taken aback by the sheer energy of it all.
My question is whether anyone has seen this level of continuous ferocity and how long it lasted? Medically, I don’t know how long his body can last being this much on edge 24/7.
And at the heart of it, he’s petrified.