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  1. #1
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    Help, toe amputation!

    I am wondering if anyone can help. OH, with longstanding Az and vas dem, is in hospital to have a vein graft to combat poor circulation caused by intermittent claudication. His surgeon phoned at 08:20 to say OH wanted me there to explain to him what was going to happen. As if we haven't talked it over several times! Then the surgeon said they would inspect his toe, which has an ulcer, under anaesthetic ( he's having an epidural) and if they couldn't save it, they would remove the toe. Was that OK with me?
    Flabbergasted. I know the toe is bad, but.....Questions are:
    How would an 81 y o dementia patient cope without a toe?
    How is he going to be after op?

    I will say that he was in hospital last month for stents in arteries in groin and he came home so much worse, not eating, not drinking, constipated, Alzheimer's stepped forward, grumpy, etc etc. you know the score!
    Many thanks

  2. #2
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    Hospitals do seem to bring out the worst in this disease. Whilst I am sorry I have no advice please accept a hug from me and I am sure there is someone here who can be some help x

  3. #3
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    This is hard for you but honestly I guess there may not be an alternative as the surgeon has said 'if we cannot save it'. I think OH will be confused anyway with different surroundings butif you are there to support him my optimistic side says he may recover better than you think. I just hope the hospital nurses are dementia trained and will help you both through this.

    My husband had a knee replacement during his dementia years - it was difficult but he did cope.

    I hope the outcome is good and the toe can be saved.
    Jan
    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    'Hope is a lover's staff, walk hence with that and manage it against despairing thoughts' (Shakespeare)


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  4. #4
    The only people who can answer your question are the doctors.

    What a terrible decision to have to make. We all know the trauma of surgery with dementia but we don`t know how his toe can affect your husband if he does`t have the surgery.

    He does seem to have a lot to contend with poor man.

    Sylvia

    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator .

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

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  5. #5
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    Would like to think the nurses are dementia trained, but afraid not. Even the surgeon does not seem to realise how bad his dementia is. The op is this pm, so not going in today, but will be there early tomorrow.
    Many thanks for your good wishes.

  6. #6
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    When my husband was having his thigh amputation, there were a number of people in the same ward having toe amputations and honestly, they managed really well.
    I think the big toe would take more time in rebalancing than any of the others but it is a question of adjusting the balance.
    It is much better to have this done as it could lead to a worse scenario if not.
    I hope all goes well.

  7. #7
    I didn`t realise the op was this afternoon.

    My best wishes to your husband Spamar for successful surgery and a speedy recovery.

    Sylvia

    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator .

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

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  8. #8
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    As long as it's not his big toe then it should be fine.

    I hope all goes well x

  9. #9
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    Hi
    Sorry to be so long in replying, but my iPad and home hub had an argument and refused to talk to one another. Had to call 'a man' to talk severely to both of them!
    Fortunately big toe has been saved and the op appears to be a success. He didn't come back to the ward until nearly 23:00 hours!
    The op was under epidural which seems to be the method of choice for people like OH these days.
    The nurses should have been warned by his sundowning post op a month ago but, as I dealt with it, it probably passed them by! Over the rest of Monday night he managed to remove ID band ( he hates them with a passion), his cannula and his epidural!!! He also tried to take out his drains and his catheter! They have never had anyone remove their epidural before. The catheter was taken out yesterday by the nurses.
    Yesterday evening he was given two units of blood, presumably without incident. However, during the night he took out two of his three drains!
    I didn't go to see him today, the hospital is not our nearest one, but the centre for this type of surgery, which is an hours drive away. So I will be interested to see what things are like tomorrow.
    Some of the nurses and support staff either have an interest in dementia, or have had some training. The tea lady is great! The doctors, well, after being asked if I was sure he had dementia, and later being asked ' I believe your husband has a history of dementia?' I feel like gathering them all together and giving a lecture on it! Meanwhile screaming one does not have a history of it, you have it! The hospital does not operate a butterfly scheme or anything similar and there are no 'this is me' booklets.

  10. #10
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    So sorry you have had such a trauma but so glad to hear the big toe has been saved.
    I hope you can relax a little now.
    Jan
    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    'Hope is a lover's staff, walk hence with that and manage it against despairing thoughts' (Shakespeare)


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  11. #11
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    Hi
    I was told yesterday he would be home today. But I'm here and he is still in hospital. There we were ready to go, bag packed, dressed, scarf and cap on. Then they said we found an abnormality in one of the enzymes that reflects heart activity, and need to check it out. May an out patient appt? The consultant says no. It took five hours to say that! So....at least another two days in a hospital an hours drive away ( if you're lucky and there hasn't been an accident and it's not rush hour). There's no guarantee he will be out on Monday. And what if they find something? There's already a query about his kidneys. Help, I can see this escalating madly!!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spamar View Post
    Hi
    I was told yesterday he would be home today. But I'm here and he is still in hospital. There we were ready to go, bag packed, dressed, scarf and cap on. Then they said we found an abnormality in one of the enzymes that reflects heart activity, and need to check it out. May an out patient appt? The consultant says no. It took five hours to say that! So....at least another two days in a hospital an hours drive away ( if you're lucky and there hasn't been an accident and it's not rush hour). There's no guarantee he will be out on Monday. And what if they find something? There's already a query about his kidneys. Help, I can see this escalating madly!!!
    I am so sorry to read your story, and my heart goes out to you. As you say, it's enough coping with dementia, but having to undertake such a nightmare of a journey, and then have this additional worry, is cruel.

    A huge virtual bouquet, and a cuppa and a cuddle (chocolate biccies too if you wish ) are winging their way to you.
    Scarlett123 xxx

  13. #13
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    Thanks Scarlet, gratefully received.
    To add insult to injury when I phoned on sat morning to find out how is was, I was told, he can come home today!!! Words failed me. I went down to get him, it still took over 2 hours to get release papers! Echocardiogram will be done as an outpatient, not that I think there will be any heart damage. Kidney damage, maybe, as we know the urates are up, as that is what the gp was investigating before events overtook us!
    I think I've probably picked up a speeding fine on the way home. Unsporting of the police to be out on a Saturday!
    Having got through a night and half a day, maybe I should have not agitated for him to come out of hospital. He got me up three times in the night, which included one pair of sheets, and has been grumpy as h....l this morning, even when district nurse came to do the dressings. Such is a Carers lot!

  14. #14
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    And now, he's incontinent and has a terrible pain under his knee ( probably!), shouted most of the night, reducing me to a resentful quivering wreck. Now waiting for doc to assess him and nurse to dress wounds. Then it's shopping for incontinent bits and pieces and more washing liquid.

 

 

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