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  1. #1
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    Stages of dementia

    I found this on a search and may help anyone to recognise any signs:

    Seven Stages of Dementia
    Stage 1:

    No cognitive impairment

    Unimpaired individuals experience no memory problems and none are evident to a health care professional during a medical interview.

    Stage 2:
    Very mild cognitive decline

    Individuals at this stage feel as if they have memory lapses, especially in forgetting words or names or the location of keys, eyeglasses, or other everyday objects. But these problems are not evident during a medical examination or apparent to friends, family or co-workers.

    Stage 3:
    Mild cognitive decline

    Friends, family or co-workers begin to notice deficiencies.
    Problems with memory or concentration may be measurable in clinical testing or discernible during a detailed medical nterview. Common difficulties include:

    Word- or name-finding problems noticeable to family or close
    associates

    Decreased ability to remember names when introduced to new people

    Performance issues in social or work settings noticeable to family,
    friends or co-workers

    Reading a passage and retaining little material

    Losing or misplacing a valuable object

    Decline in ability to plan or organize

    Stage 4:
    Moderate cognitive decline

    At this stage, a careful medical interview detects clear-cut
    deficiencies in the following areas:

    Decreased knowledge of recent occasions or current events

    Impaired ability to perform challenging mental arithmetic-for
    example, to count backward from 100 by 7s

    Decreased capacity to perform complex tasks, such as marketing,
    planning dinner for guests or paying bills and managing finances

    Reduced memory of personal history

    The affected individual may seem subdued and withdrawn, especially
    in socially or mentally challenging situations

    Stage 5:
    Moderately severe cognitive decline

    Major gaps in memory and deficits in cognitive function emerge.
    Some assistance with day-to-day activities becomes essential. At
    this stage, individuals may:

    Be unable during a medical interview to recall such important
    details as their current address, their telephone number or the name
    of the college or high school from which they graduated

    Become confused about where they are or about the date, day of the week, or season

    Have trouble with less challenging mental arithmetic; for example, counting backward from 40 by 4s or from 20 by 2s

    Need help choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion

    Usually retain substantial knowledge about themselves and know their own name and the names of their spouse or children

    Usually require no assistance with eating or using the toilet

    Stage 6:
    Severe cognitive decline

    Memory difficulties continue to worsen, significant personality
    changes may emerge and affected individuals need extensive help with customary daily activities. At this stage, individuals may:

    Lose most awareness of recent experiences and events as well as of their surroundings

    Recollect their personal history imperfectly, although they
    generally recall their own name

    Occasionally forget the name of their spouse or primary caregiver
    but generally can distinguish familiar from unfamiliar faces

    Need help getting dressed properly; without supervision, may make such errors as putting pajamas over daytime clothes or shoes on wrong feet

    Experience disruption of their normal sleep/waking cycle

    Need help with handling details of toileting (flushing toilet,
    wiping and disposing of tissue properly)

    Have increasing episodes of urinary or fecal incontinence

    Experience significant personality changes and behavioral symptoms,
    including suspiciousness and delusions (for example, believing that their caregiver is an impostor); hallucinations (seeing or hearing
    things that are not really there); or compulsive, repetitive behaviors such as hand-wringing or tissue shredding

    Tend to wander and become lost

    Stage 7:
    Very severe cognitive decline

    This is the final stage of the disease when individuals lose the ability to respond to their environment, the ability to speak and, ultimately, the ability to control movement.

    Frequently individuals lose their capacity for recognizable speech,
    although words or phrases may occasionally be uttered

    Individuals need help with eating and toileting and there is
    general incontinence of urine

    Individuals lose the ability to walk without assistance, then the
    ability to sit without support, the ability to smile, and the ability to hold their head up. Reflexes become abnormal and muscles
    grow rigid. Swallowing is impaired.
     

  2. #2
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    Interesting. Bill definitely stage 6 in this but without the behavioural issues.
    Izzy
    Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    ABOUT ME.

    'The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life.'
    Robert Louis Stevenson
     

  3. #3
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    My Mum is at stage 6. Not knowing my name, cannot remmember if she has eaten. Says children had come in and stolen her door key when she can't find it.
    the shredding of the tissues is the worst. She folds up squares of toilet paper and keeps it in her pocket. She forgets she has some in her pocket and continues to add to it. Makes all her clothes look scruffy as all the bits of tissue stick to them, bobbling effect on her trousers.
     

  4. #4
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    Bill hasn't got any of these agitation issues but I would still say he's stage 6. I'm so lucky he is contented. Long may this last.
    Izzy
    Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    ABOUT ME.

    'The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life.'
    Robert Louis Stevenson
     

  5. #5
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    Thank you ladywriter, that is very interesting, and helpful, because I was wondering how far down the line my dad is. I think he is 6, going toward 7.....

    he is doubly incontinent, completely immobile, thinks he is either 47 or 95 but never knows his own age or date of birth, thinks he was in the second world war and it started in Malta (he is too young, at 79, to have served in the war, and was in Malta in 1959 in the Navy). He has terrible hallucinations about POW camps and is madly paranoid, and when he gets a UTI which is every few weeks, the brain flips and he is virtually incoherent, but on a good day, or in a good hour, he is relatively lucid.

    Does that sound like 6...?

    It's a horrible cruel disease, whatever stage people are at. And heartbreaking for those of us watching them decline.

    Trisha
    xx
     

  6. #6
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    Final stage

    My dad is in the final stage of dementia. He has been in hospital with constant infections since January and has deteriorated further since then. He hasn't spoken for a week, and when awake sits and stares with little recognition in his eyes. Occasionally he gives a faint smile. Dad doesn't want to eat or drink, and is hydrated by a drip. Has hasn't been to the toilet 'properly' for over two weeks, although he's now bed bound and incontinent. All this and he was only diagnosed with VD last October. It's heartbreaking to see, I adore him so much. He was such a vibrant, loving dad who to me, set the benchmark for other people to match up to. We are taking comfort from the fact dad is pain free, but my heart sinks when I sit and think about what has happened to my lovely dad. Dad's dementia has progressed so fast, I'll never understand how or why.
     

  7. #7
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    There's a more detailed document here: http://www.alzinfo.org/clinical-stages-of-alzheimers
    Same basic course, but it breaks some of the stages down a bit more.
     

  8. #8
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    Not much to look forward to is there? I've been thinking my mum still has some way to go, but it looks like she's reached stage 7. I hope she doesn't lose the ability to smile - her lovely smile when she looks at me, or anyone who is familiar to her, is one of the few things she has left of the person she used to be.
    I realised recently how my expectations have changed - I no longer regret that I can't have a conversation with her, instead I am delighted if she says something I recognise. On Sunday she said 'daughter' and 'I like you' and I came away feeling so happy - just like when your toddler says their first words. Such a shame.
     

  9. #9
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    Stage 4 for me , ....I think ! or who knows !!
     

  10. #10
    Sharon is half way through the final paragraph, but still has a beautiful smile occasionally.
    richard
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~
    Read "Our Story" here: http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/sc...ocumentID=1924
     

  11. #11
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    Scotty dog

    Oh scotty-dog.......... girls and their dads eh? I lost my gorgeous dad six years ago, and about a year later a friend sent me this quote she had read somewhere. I found it so comforting - and I hope you and others will too:
    ' There's something like a line of gold running through a man's words when he talks to his daughter, and gradually, over the years, it gets to be long enough for you to pick up and weave into a cloth that feels like love itself'
     

  12. #12
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    3, 5, 7, 9 stages of dementia

    I once posted a link on TP to an Australian site that had the 5 stage view, superimposed with MMSE (Mini Mental State Evaluation) scores and I found that to be the most convincing in the case of my wife, who had mixed dementia - Alzheimer's and Vascular.

    I have now been catapulted back into DementiaWorld, closely helping someone who has, primarily, Vascular Dementia. She is much older than Jan was and is going through the most difficult part at present. The course of her dementia is definitely different, but I find the 5 stage principle model still seems to apply.

    Around the Internet you will find other models, for 3, 5, and more than 7 stages.

    Any model of dementia symptoms is only an attempt to categorise how dementia develops, and there are in reality no precise 'stages'. I always found it helpful to use such a schematic to try to figure out where we were - and now, with the new person, where we are.

    There are so many different types of dementia that the stages will, in any case, vary in timing, duration and intensity.

    I've included a screen shot amalgamating two slides I used to use when invited to help with the induction courses at Alzheimer's Society. The bottom schematic shows the duration for Jan, of each stage.

    Best advice is to use whichever way seems best for yourself, to determine how things are going.

    Good luck!
    Attached Images  
    Bruce

    I'm still a Carer.

    "I don't suppose I'll see you much more. We had lovely times. I love you very much." Jan's words, October 2000

    "You'll take care of my daughter, won't you?" an ailing mother's words, 2013

    "I always thought you were thick" an ailing mother's words to me, 2013. How right you are….
     

  13. #13
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    My husband very definitely stage 6 . Not the personality change but very definitely repetitive activities and tissue shredding!! Plus all the rest. Won't let me try and get him dressed this morning, too busy arranging cushions in a neat row.
     

  14. #14
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    Been there and have reached stage 7 in writing our story. Last paragraph: the inability to hold one's head up without support. Refused to eat and rigidity had set in. Incapable of using limbs; required to be lifted from bed to chair.
    It took the best part of nine months to get my wife back to her original weight and a little longer where she could once again capable of holding her head up.
    The best I can say is that I'm pleased I never read all this information (I was too busy) when I was caring for my wife, but then I never blindly follow what I'm told.
     

  15. #15
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    I have no idea which level mum is at, I think she might be at an inbetween stage (if there is such a thing), as she shows signs that are in one stage and signs from a level different one, will have to sit down and go through it with s fine tooth comb!
     

 

 

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