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  1. #61
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    Care of the elderly panorama

    How sickening that these ignorant carers abusing the eldely patients will we ever have a system that is safe for the aged person.
    All carers should have full training.i feel that due to the lack of jobs that some carers just do it for the money, and not with the love and compation that goes with the job all carers should be vetted.i feet so angry watching the abuse towards the patient on the panorama last night

  2. #62
    Members may be interested in the following statement

    .The Relatives & Residents Association (R&RA) is calling for a complete review of the Care Quality Commission, the body which regulates care homes for older people, following the shocking expose on BBC’s Panorama.

    The charity’s chair, Judy Downey, has written to the Secretary of State for Health calling for an immediate increase to the frequency of inspections and a complete overhaul in the way they are conducted.

    The charity also wants to see a regulator which listens to, and deals appropriately with, individual complaints.

    Said Ms Downey “We cannot go on watching the same mistakes being repeated over and over, the government HAS to do something now. We’ve seen evidence, reports from the Health Select Committee, the Public Accounts Committee, the Audit Commission and the Capability Review by the Department of Health all saying the same thing – that CQC is not effectively regulating care homes. At what point is the government going to accept that the regulator is not fit for purpose?”

    BBC1’s Panorama shows the shocking treatment meted out to 80-year-old Maria Worroll, a resident at Ash Court Care Centre, a nursing home for older people. Footage, obtained from a hidden camera placed in Mrs Worroll’s room by her concerned daughter, revealed a nurse slapping and treating the dementia sufferer so roughly she cried out in pain.

    In a further catalogue of breaches, footage showed four other carers speaking amongst themselves - never once addressing the elderly woman - and restraining her arms whilst feeding her. Five care workers have been dismissed with one of them, the nurse, being sentenced to eighteen months in prison.

    The abuse took place in a care home which had previously been given an excellent rating by the Care Quality Commission. In a report published after the victim’s daughter’s had raised the alarm the home was judged as ‘meeting all the essential standards of quality and safety’. Mrs Worroll’s daughter, Jane, had neither been consulted nor interviewed by the inspectors and, as far as the charity is aware, they did not seek to view the damning footage she had secured.

    Continued Ms Downey, “We’re appalled that CQC, in their intelligence gathering of this case, didn’t consider it necessary to consult with the key person. The elderly victim in this scenario had done nothing to antagonize her carers and yet not one but five people were shown to have behaved so disgracefully that it resulted in their dismissal with one of them being imprisoned. Alarm bells should have been jangling very loudly at CQC about the culture of this establishment. We just can’t understand the superficial way they appear to have dealt with this case."

    “We have lost total faith not just in the frequency of care home inspections but the manner, too, in which they are carried out. The changes we have seen to regulation in the last five years are putting older people more at risk than they’ve ever been in the last twenty five years. We’re going backwards”.

    The charity is calling for a minimum of twice yearly inspections to be reinstated in care homes with at least one of them being unannounced and conducted in way which ensures that evidence is properly gathered and scrutinized.

    Additionally, they want the regulator to take responsibility for responding to serious complaints about care and conditions in care homes. The charity will be seeking further meetings with the Secretary of State and the regulator as a matter of urgency
    Last edited by SerenaS; 17-10-2012 at 02:40 PM.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackyS View Post
    I think the points you make in your last paragraph are particularly valid, Tre (not that the rest aren't by the way!). Surely there must be something we can do around this? I'm now actively looking for a care home that my Mum will need very soon. I don't know anyone locally who has a relative in a care home, so I can't rely on word of mouth. I now know that I can't rely on CQC reports either. Ultimately, I know I must do my own research, but, come on Alzheimers Org - please can I get some help from you (or this lovely community you've helped to set up)??
    Anyone reading this thread or anyone that watched Panorama last night,i feel for you if you are making the decision to put a loved one into a care home.

    My experience from the first day i visited my mother in her care home was horrific,but i didn't choose mum's home(she was bed blocking,so was thrown out of hospital and put in the only care home that would take her.)

    CQC reports are useless,mum's home was rated excellent.I had no option to move mum,the other homes in the area were just as bad.

    Because i encountered such bad care,if i had to do it again,i would go with my gut instinct.The carers i came across didn't even greet me when i walked in,their body language told me they didn't care,i was told i was 'too emotional' where mum was concerned.I know now if i walked into another home,i would know what to look for.Carer's engaging with residents,management understanding your fears and knowing the home is your loved ones 'home'.

    There are good homes out there.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by kassy View Post
    .....
    .I know now if i walked into another home,i would know what to look for.Carer's engaging with residents,management understanding your fears and knowing the home is your loved ones 'home'.

    There are good homes out there.
    Thanks Kassy for your final statement. I found that programme scary, to think people can treat anyone like that, particularly someone so vulnerable, is beyond belief. As you know I found it even more scary, as the person I care most about, my husband, has just gone into a care home, as it was no longer viable to care for him at home.

    I spent a lot of time finding out information about the home, I visited a few times, at different times during the day, totally unannounced, so I could see life as it really is. I found some carers sitting chatting with residents whilst others were busy supporting. Every person I met smiled and spoke to me.

    Since he has been there, this friendly treatment has continued. The manager is very much hands on and her door is always open. The residents sometimes take themselves into the nursing station and sit and chat. So far so good.

    I must say, I will never feel I can just sit back, I will always be vigilant, as it only takes one bad apple... I think it is also worth remembering that a good manager is vital, knowing what is happening within the home.

    The home has an 'open door' policy, so you can visit at any time, let yourself in and share quality time. The staff are always happy to discuss issues or positives with you and listen, knowing that I know R best.

    Long may this positive feeling last (even though I miss him loads).

    Jan x
    “Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without.” - Buddha

  5. #65
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    It made me weep and now I'm wondering did Mum really fall when she had broke her finger, her hip had a black eye, bruising around her eye etc ?. She could not speak or communicate in any way and had severe cognitive disabilities. I will never know and the anger I feel right now cannot be described in words.

  6. #66
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    One practical solution could be for relatives to spend more time in the CH in a volunteer capacity, perhaps helping with activities, in the same way that mums are encouraged to help out in classrooms.

    Spending time with the staff, being 'one of the team', would be a very good way to get a feel for what's going on, and would give a good opportunity to quietly observe.

    One lady who's parent is in my mum's CH took a part-time job there for pretty much that reason but her mother is just as anxious and upset, even when her daughter is working there. It's clearly the stage she's at in her illness, not the care she's receving in the home.

  7. #67
    One practical solution could be for relatives to spend more time in the CH in a volunteer capacity, perhaps helping with activities, in the same way that mums are encouraged to help out in classrooms.

    Spending time with the staff, being 'one of the team', would be a very good way to get a feel for what's going on, and would give a good opportunity to quietly observe.


    I couldn't agree more. I cannot stress enough how much relatives need to play a full and active part in the welfare of their relatives when in a care home setting. Far too many relatives do not seem to want, or seem afraid of, becoming actively involved. Any care home who does not welcome such involvement would immediately be raising alarm bells in my head.

    But alongside this essential relative involvement in the care home, we need to have nationally qualified staff whose efforts are recognised in their pay packet and who are managed effectively, no matter how big or small the organisation.

    In order to safeguard residents who do not have relatives watching over care the CQC needs to inspect at least twice a year, one a full inspection of all paperwork and once to observe the interraction between staff and staff, staff and residents, staff and management. This is the only way to check that the ethos amongst the staff complies with the true spirit of CQC regulations. The CQC should also be using 'lay inspectors' or 'inspectors by experience' who think outside the culture of the CQC and who have a wealth of experience to offer which has been gained from 'the other side of the fence'.

    CQC also bear the guilt for not properly investigating complaints made to them. Anyone who complains on behalf of residents should be delat with courteously and dilligently, not in an offhand and dismissive manner.

    I've written about the above for years on TP now and echo other posters in asking, when will it all be put right?

    xxTinaT
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for everything....

  8. #68
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    Any organisation can perform twice a year for an inspection, that's the problem, and I don't see a way round that.

    Let's get the relatives in there and they can the be the eyes and ears, and if necessary, the whistleblowers - much better than another level of bureaucracy and something that could be implemented at minimal cost tomorrow.

  9. #69
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    I can see from the comments, not a lot of us have anything good to say about the CQC. When they came into our care home for an unannounced inspection last year, I was surprised that the assessor concentrated more on whether paperwork was up to date and records were complete. Admittedly, the inspector spent some time in both lounges, watching the carers going about their work, but in the main, most time was spent in the office going through a mountain of paperwork. I do feel that a lot of paperwork could and should be simplified, and the amount of paperwork can and should be reduced. The amount of time spent doing paperwork in both the care industry and health professions, is time that should be spent, caring and nursing.
    One thing I find unbelievable with the CQC though is, the fact that they don't state minimum staffing levels in care and nursing homes, yet set minimum standards of care. Nowhere on their website (or the internet) will you find mention of staffing levels,. Save the fact that they say staffing levels should be appropriate So what do you consider to be appropriate?

  10. #70
    I again agree wholeheartedly Chemmy but until and unless relatives do this very thing we have to fight to get the right kind of inspections being done. And relatives need to be aware of those residents who do not have a relative to watch over them.

    The only way relatives can do this vital job is if the care homes allow this. Personally I would make it known BEFORE my relative went into a care home that the management understood and complied with my demand that I be actively involved in all aspectys of the care of my relative..

    I still feel that there should also be a government body such as the CQC to inspect because as a relative of just one resident , I would not be able to check that care plans were being complied with or medication plans being completed for other residents who did not have regular visits from relatives. I cannot ask to see these as a non relative because of the laws on privacy and confidentiality.

    Only a body such as the CQC have the rights and powers to thoroughly check all aspects of care. Where the CQC have gone wrong is because there was too much emphasis on the registration process and not enough inspections were being undertaken. Likewise complaints were not being properly dealt with. I also feel that more 'lay inspectors should be working alongside CQC inspectors The lay inspectors could concentrate on the observation s and the CQC inspectors concentrate on the paperwork. Then a full and clearer report could be complied.

    Paperwork is important in order to keep a check on what care a resident is recieving. I once asked a carer what a resident had eaten (or not eaten) for breakfast. She had no idea because she had not been on duty in the morning. All carers need to have a good 'hand over' period of time where staff from a previous shift can pass on information to the next shift. The only way to do this is through what they have recorded about residents.

    The inspection reporting procedures also need to be more clear and 'user friendly' because at the moment the published reports on their website are less than useless for anyone wishning to find out about a care home.

    xxTinaT
    Last edited by TinaT; 24-04-2012 at 04:36 PM.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for everything....

  11. #71
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    If i was a manager of a care home,i would be telling all my staff,be very careful,there could be hidden cameras.I worked in elderly peoples own homes and i would have been fine with it.

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by handyjack View Post
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    "One thing I find unbelievable with the CQC though is, the fact that they don't state minimum staffing levels in care and nursing homes, yet set minimum standards of care. Nowhere on their website (or the internet) will you find mention of staffing levels,. Save the fact that they say staffing levels should be appropriate So what do you consider to be appropriate?
    Well said mate
    But when we put our names on a government petition it got a miserable response
    (excepting of course those who did sign)
    jimbo 111

  13. #73
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    Sadly relatives cannot be with their loved ones 24/7 in a care home setting. I visited my Mum on a regular basis [ as did the lady in the Panorama prog ] and naturally the staff would put their best face on when we were there !! I also read her care notes at every visit and if I were not happy with something then I noted that in her care notes. For example the lady on the Panorama prog instructed the home that she wanted only a female nurse/carer to wash her mother but clearly that instruction was ignored when the male nurse / carer washed this poor defenseless lady and proceeded to slap her . I also asked the care home to remove a low table from her room as Mum would not see it and trip over it. It was still there when I next visited I had to physically take it to the carer and ask them to place it anywhere else other than my Mums room !! I also asked them to stop noteing in their notes that Mum was using ' sign language ' to communicate. She has never been able to sign [ even before dementia ].

    What I want to say is that we can instruct the care home manager till we are blue in the face but that does not mean to say that these instructions are carried out. It is well beyond the relatives control what does actually happen when they are not there.

    And the day staff whom we see when we visit durng the day can be totally different to the night staff. I have said all through the nearly 10 years my Mum was in nursing homes that CCTV should be installed in every room then we could see [ via web cam ] how our relatives were really being treat.

  14. #74
    A timely reminder Jimbo!!

    Here is the petition website for signatures:

    https://submissions.epetitions.direc.../signature/new

    To anyone reading this current thread I would ask please, please sign. I know a million signatures are needed and we are probably whistling in the wind but as I keep on saying, 'from little acorns, mighty oak trees grow'

    Boudica - perhaps we should be setting up a petition for CCTV webcams linked to a website which we could access with our own individual, private password. NOW THAT SOUNDS A MASSIVE STEP FORWARD!!

    xxTinaT
    Last edited by TinaT; 24-04-2012 at 04:51 PM.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for everything....

  15. #75
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    Thumbs up Well Said Tina T ( Post 70 ) ! ! & thank you Tina T

    Hello Everybody & Tina T , Can see this "Thread " has become a bit of a "debate " about good care in Care & N Homes ! Nothing wrong in that ! & agree with what Tina T has "Posted " about C Q C & other things ( post 70 ) Am a Kitchen Asst in a E M I N Home & we have had 2 C Q C Inspections ( new Manager etc ) & from what i can "gather " they are keen for the "Carer's " to do more Pen Pushing ( tho agree its important ! ! ) than "real caring " & am sure we could do with more Care Staff ! & like others have signed the "Petition"

    Did NOT watch Panorama because just did not want to ! ( tho saw a tiny bit on the T V News )

    Love Grove x
    Where there is injury,pardon;
    Where there is dicord,union;
    Where there is doubt, faith;
    Where there is despair; hope;
    Where there is darkness,light;
    Where there is sadness,joy;

    ST Francis Of Assisi

 

 

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