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  1. #1

    Alzheimer's Society comment of Delivering Dignity report

    A draft report published on Tuesday, 28 February 2012 highlights the need for change in the way that older people are cared for within hospitals and care homes.

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  2. #2
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    Hallelujah!!!! Finally - a true lightbulb moment, a Damascene road revelation. Care and compassion, APTITUDE is as important, if not MORE important than skill-set in getting professional carers to treat the vulnerable, clients and patients, as people! The new report suggests that when recruiting for nurses, carers etc, attitude, values and aptitude must be taken into account. "Where there is no cure, there is always care". And where there is no care, no compassion - there is despair. Just one day's reading on TP will reveal just how much.

    Blindingly obvious to all of us here. How did it take so long?! Best start to the day in years. The next question is how to make it happen?

  3. #3
    I`m pleased to say this was the topic for discussion on BBC Radio Kent this morning.

    It is the attribute I have credited my husband`s one star home with since day one.

    Sylvia

    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator .

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

    About me

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Haylett View Post
    ------------------------------------

    "Where there is no cure, there is always care". And where there is no care, no compassion-------------------------------------

    Blindingly obvious to all of us here. How did it take so long?! Best start to the day in years. The next question is how to make it happen?
    In all the time I have been concerned with dementia and the care of the elderly
    I have never seen a more appropriate or more hard hittig quote than that above
    I don't know if they are your own words Haylett or someone elses but they should be printed as a reminder at the top of all communications (in big red letters) involved in
    health care

    jimbo 111

  5. #5
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    My dad was in and out of hospital for 20 years,from the age of 49 until his death aged 69.He had dementia type symptoms because of a brain aneurism.He,obviously wasn't elderly,but was terribly neglected.I had to spend every day at the hospital to feed him because the nurses didn't bother.I ended up feeding other patients too,until one day i exploded in the nurses station.There were 7 nurses sitting chatting,and i asked why none of them were catering for the needs of their patients.There reply was 'why don't you volunteer?'

    My dad was shouted at because he was incontinent,called a dirty buggar.

    I too had terrible treatment in hospital for many years.

    Then my dear mum,neglected and abused.

    Its not just elderly,we all deserve to be treated with compassion,dignity and respect.

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=jimbo 111;556879]In all the time I have been concerned with dementia and the care of the elderly
    I have never seen a more appropriate or more hard hittig quote than that above
    I don't know if they are your own words Haylett or someone elses but they should be printed as a reminder at the top of all communications (in big red letters) involved in
    health care


    Jimbo 111 - thank you for kind comment! And you're so right - it is a very powerful statement.

    Not mine - but that of a wonderful Community Psychiatric Nurse whom I first met 10 years ago. She and a close colleague dedicated their lives to improving care for and recognition of, those with dementia and people who really care for them. I don't know whether she was quoting Kitwood, or any other leading expert in the field - I wouldn't at all be surprised if the words were her/their own. But I have never forgotten them. I'm so glad that they resonated with you too.

    Kassy - 100% right. The care/neglect you describe is appalling - and it haunts you, doesn't it?
    Last edited by Haylett; 29-02-2012 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Response to post

  7. #7
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    Eleven to twelve years ago I learned that compassion and understanding were non-existent in the system. One might be able to teach rather than train understanding, but when it comes to compassion one is either compassionate or their not.

    Vocation was the requirement in nursing and care many decades ago, sadly society has moved on with better machines, administrators and money. The most caring and compassionate people now direct their time and efforts to the third world, helping the starving and poor.

    The sad fact is that understanding comes when one becomes 'elderly', then your being told what's best for you by people less than half your age, who have passed exams and read books on AD. So we're left thinking why bother we're considered 'pass it'?
    As I traveled in the Middle East, Far East and a number of European countries it was noticeable the poorer people were the more generous, compassionate and considerate the society were. The elderly were treated with respect for their knowledge and contribution to society.
    The richer we become financially as a society, the poorer we become as a caring society.

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    I would be very interestedto know if these people who are supposed to be caring professionals ( I am only refering to the bad ones here- there are some good people) would want their relatives treated like this.
    There was a brilliant idea in a letter in the Guardian this week suggesting that all those MPs who vote for the current NHS bill should have to use only the NHS for their care and their relatives care in the future. I would like to see how many of them would vote for it if that was the case. Mostly they do not care because it does not affect them as they have the money to opt out and go privately. It strkes me that a lot of the people with the clout to get things changed do not bother because they have the money to opt out.
    Tre

  9. #9
    I wait to see what the government will actually DO about this report. What will they change? I would suggest that they change the following things:

    1) Ensure a minimum number of carers to residents ratio by law in all care homes.

    2) Ensure that on all general wards there is a registered nurse who is in charge of a care plan for any dementia patient on that ward and supervises any nurse who cares for that patient.

    2) Ensure that ALL carers in residential homes have compulsory dementia training by law with a recognised national qualification to aim for.

    3) Ensure that all registered nurses and student nurses have a compulsory element of their training devoted solely to dementia care.

    How is the Alzheimer Society proposing to use the report findings to put pressure on the government and on training bodies?

    xxTinaT
    Last edited by TinaT; 29-02-2012 at 08:59 PM.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for everything....

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    I've yet to see the last 12 years worth of government reports and audits being acted upon. I won't be holding my breath on this.

    As part of my studies I have read three different reports all saying the same thing "forget me not" in 2000; the NHS plan in 2004 and the National Dementia Strategy in 2009. They all say what we should be doing with the elderly and those with dementia. All great in theory, but the funding and the will to change things, and the care and compassion just isn't there in practice.

  11. #11
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    Why do they spend time, money and researches to compile reports? All they have to do is to gather all the information they require by reading the views of tens of thousands of posts on TP over the past 12 years or more, by the real people on the sharp receiving end.
    That's not going to happen so why bother?

 

 

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