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  1. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hereford
    Posts
    894
    I'm hopeless at recalling names and I put it down to the fact that I've no real reason to remember every name. When I go shopping I find I can't remember the names of certain items though I know what I want.
    When my wife was first diagnosed with AD I could never recall the name of the person assigned to our case. As it became important to remember his name I designed a way to recall the name when required. Sixteen years later I can repeat it: Adrian Newton. Hadrian's Wall plus the apple fell from the tree= Newton. For other names I go through the alphabet and add a letter to trigger a name.
    I'm of the opinion that we remember the name we consider important to us. I ask myself: how come I can recall names of certain people from my childhood, some 75 yrs ago and not others? They made an impression that remained.
    One thing I can't do is recall directions and can easily get lost. For most of my life I put it down to being born left-handed and it being beaten out of me. In recent years I've learned it was due to having my head split open at about six years old. It was in the area of the brain that deals with orientation!
    When you care, of have cared for a loved one with AD it is only natural to start question each time you forget somethings. Carers have more than enough brain activity and are too stressed to think clearly. Sorry to bore you.

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,708
    Hi Padraig,

    I wasn't bored at all by that-in fact it was really interesting. You're right, carers do have more than enough on their plate, it's no wonder we forget things.

    Loved the Adrian Newton example. It wouldn't work for me tho, because I'd forget the Hadrian's Wall name and the Isaac Newton most likely. It would have to be another type of link, maybe something a bit humourous or ridiculous so that I could make a bizarre mental picture.

    I was also born left handed and had it smacked out of me at nursery. I can also struggle with directions. I was map reading for hubby once and reached a T junction. I told him to 'go sideways!!!' I have a left handed brother and both my grandchildren are left-handed. I often wonder if I'd have been a different character if my left-handedness hadn't been changed. I guess it's more of a right-handed world so maybe they did us a favour, eh?
    It's hard to feel as fit as a fiddle when you're the shape of a cello.

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hereford
    Posts
    894
    Recently our daughter reminded me of the times I took her for walks when she was little and we got lost.
    During my athletic days I always remained behind the leader in cross-country races. Once I went to the front and lead the field astray, though some runners knew not to follow me and went their own way. It was strange to watch runners coming from all directions at the finish.
    The worst race for me was Manchester to Blackpool when I was leading by a large margin towards the end of the race, then I went off course. When put back on course a fellow club member caught up with me and suggested we finish in a dead heat. Silly fool I agreed. He slipped past me at the finish!

  4. #19
    New User
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    west dunbartonshire
    Posts
    5
    I coach football to kids from the ages 6-9, I'm constantly asking their names, often more than once through out each session. I am waiting on a couple of hospital appointments, two of which I had to reschedule because of starting training for a new job a few weeks back. New dates are in for one now which is good. I have not been on this site for a long time because I forgot what site it was and couldn't remember my password (I have to laugh at the irony).
    An email sent to me with a link put me back on track. At the grand old age of 32 my brain is mush. I don't drink or smoke, physically in shape and active. I have controlled Epilepsy, with having very few seizures in my life. If only their were brain transplants available.

  5. #20
    I have had problems remembering names for years. This week it went one step further.

    I went to see our grandson in the preliminary heats of the Performing Arts Awards. Among other things he sang two songs. `I dreamed a dream` and `Get happy`.

    On the way home I could not remember the name of the second song even though both my grandson and DiL told me twice. When I got home I did a Google search for songs sung by Judy Garland . Once I had seen `Get Happy` in writing I have had no problem remembering it since. Perhaps the two way imput , seeing it in writing as well as hearing it , helped.

    The same night, on the phone to a friend, neither of us could name the Les Miserables/Susan Boyle song.

    Sylvia

    Former Carer and Volunteer Moderator .

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

    About me

  6. #21
    New User
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    RAMSGATE
    Posts
    1

    Hello er thingy.

    I have had that problem for many years. I can't remember the names of my grandchildren but can any from 50 years ago. Try not to over think the problem and worry. A mental picture of someone famous with the same name can be recalled and jogs the memory. The brain can adapt its workings and get around problems.

 

 

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