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  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Bristol
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    24

    Mums keeps falling out of Bed

    Afternoon All

    Has anyone else encountered the same problem as us with my mum?

    Mum is starting to have falls in and around the bed. It appears that mostly it is that mum gets up during the night or early morning, potters around in her bed and then when she gets back into bed doesn't orientate herself properly (lying right on the edge of the bed) and then rolls over and out of the bed. We have had a couple of these experiences in the past but they are now getting more regular. Today the carer found mum sat on the floor next to her bed. An ambulance was called to help get her up as she cannot get up by herself(mostly co-ordination issues & unable to understand instructions). My mum is 61 and lives at home with my 2 brothers who have stayed to look after her alongside working full time. They are putting her back to bed numerous times a night but she just keeps getting back up. It hadn't previously been too much of a problem but now she keeps rolling off the bed or going to sit on the bed and missing and then struggles to get back up.

    I am waiting for a call back from the OT dealing with mum but I know previously they will not use cot sides as the injuries which could occur climbing over a cot side are greater than just rolling off the bed. (although I don't think mum would try and climb out)

    Anyone else been down this road with their loved ones?
     

  2. #2
    I did. And I was told the same thing about the cot sides. However, in my mother case she wasn't intending to get up, she was simply (!) rolling out of bed. I did end up getting a soft form of bed side designed for a toddler, and then when she was in the nursing home, they did use cot sides.

    Other people have had some success with placing something (like rolled up towels) under the mattress at the edge of the bed to make this rolling out more difficult. Other options include lowering the bed, placing the mattress on the floor or placing another mattress or similar alongside the bed so there is something soft to fall onto. All of these options, though, are problematic if the person actually intends to get out of bed, in which case not much will stop them and they may well hurt themselves doing so (my mother when in hospital was so determined to get out of bed when cot sides were up that she scooted down to the bottom of the bed where were all the levers and contraptions that hospital beds have to raise and lower them and got completely caught up in them).
    Jennifer

    Volunteer moderator and former long distance carer.

    A test of a people is how it behaves toward the old. It is easy to love children. Even tyrants and dictators make a point of being fond of children. But the affection and care for the old, the incurable, the helpless are the true gold mines of a culture.

    Abraham J. Heschel
     

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Perthshire Scotland
    Posts
    877
    Blog Entries
    11
    I saw these the other day- they're designed for children but can't see why they couldn't be used for adults. Basically a fitted sheet with pockets where you insert an inlatable tube. Would certainly stop the rolling out of bed issue without any risk of injury.

    http://www.gltc.co.uk/pws/ProductDet...ID=10000001628
     

  4. #4
    They look brilliant Kazza and if I'd known about them I would have tried them.

    But I doubt they would have helped in our case as I had similar problems to you, Sunflower. My husband forgot he needed help getting out of bed so he would fall or slide out a couple of times a night and I also had to call paramedics out more or less every night because I couldn't lift him back into bed. The problem could not be resolved Nd it was that, together with frequent walkabouts which brought forwards the decision for residential care.

    Sylvia
    Carer and Member of the Volunteer Moderation Team

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

    About me
     

  5. #5
    My mum was doing that all the time so I pushed her bed against the wall then found mum was wondering around at night because she was scared of being alone in the room so I put a TV in her left it on all night.

    She would just get up go to the toilet and the light from the TV seem like a beckon of light that would direct mum back into her room and she would sit on the bed lay down even if it was the wrong way around .

    OT did advice lowering the bed, but then mum could not life herself up from the bed so a Zimmer frame help her with that and as mum had it in early days before the demetica got worse it help mum remember how to use it when things progressed with mum losing her balance while walking
    "You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only option."
    Author: Unknown

    Each person experiences dementia in their own individual way.
     

 

 

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