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  1. #1
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    Gait/Posture Leaning to one side

    Hi

    My mum wanders around the care home all day long consequently gets tired and is far more prone to falls.

    She has started to lean markedly over to one side - this makes her far more unsteady. The last time this happened she was at her own home and I stopped the anti-psychotic amusulpride (gradually) and her posture straightened up and she stopped falling.

    The home have stopped giving her the amusulpride - and the leaning over to one side has recently started again. She has been prescribed Lorazepam prn.

    The home asked me if I have any ideas; She has also in the last few days got quite moody even to the point of lashing out at staff - which she previously had NEVER done.

    They are going to try to get a Urine sample (v.difficult) and give her some laxatives as her belly is v.swollen (last day or so) and these are making her feel unwell hence the moody behaviour.

    Any ideas?

    Worried as home doesn't have an EMI unit and I would hate to have to take mum out as its such a good home.
     

  2. #2
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    Hi Terry

    all the things that are being tried are sensible.

    Jan went through this way back in 2001 when I was still caring for her at home. I'm not sure we ever truly found the reason.

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    Even today, way further down the line, Jan falls to the same side - though back in 2001 sometimes she would lean the other way.

    I have seen other residents at Jan's home leaning forwards andf back - drastically - too,
    Bruce

    I'm still a Carer.

    "I don't suppose I'll see you much more. We had lovely times. I love you very much." Jan's words, October 2000

    "You'll take care of my daughter, won't you?" an ailing mother's words, 2013

    "I always thought you were thick" an ailing mother's words to me, 2013. How right you are….
     

  3. #3
    Hi Terry,

    Lionel exhibited his tendancy throughout his illness, not always, but very frequently.

    Walked leaning sideways, and several times leaning backwards. Most frightening. Even sitting would lean over sideways.
    Made taking him out in the car difficult, as he would be leant over so far that he would be resting on me, so that I could not change gear.

    Like Bruce, never did find a reason.

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    Connie

    Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    "Today is as good as it gets" - Lionel, upon diagnosis 2002
     

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the posts - and pictures do say more than words; Lionel and Jan look like mum.

    Whats a nightmare about this illness as it progresses you have to start again - i.e. what worked before may not work again becuase the problem may have gone or that approach just might not work anymore.
     

  5. #5
    Hi Terry,

    what worked before may not work again becuase the problem may have gone or that approach just might not work anymore.
    So true. The only thing predicable about dementia is it's unpredicability.
    Connie

    Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    "Today is as good as it gets" - Lionel, upon diagnosis 2002
     

  6. #6
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    Hello:

    Yes my husband also leans. At first it was only to the left, but now as he sleeps he is very much to the right. Also when he walks, now only with a frame, he is almost bent double. When I try the same position my back HURTS. He just cannot understand that if he stood more straight, he would have less back pain

    It is sad we cannot do more about it. Jan
     

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyJan View Post
    He just cannot understand that if he stood more straight, he would have less back pain
    Dhiren is showing signs of problems with posture.

    When we sit on benches at the seaside, he keeps sliding down. He is able to correct himself, but for how long?

    And standing at the bus stop, he has to lean against something. Even then, he keeps straightening himself but is unable to maintain that straightness.

    Sylvia
    Carer and Member of the Volunteer Moderation Team

    I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet

    About me
     

  8. #8
    John has never leaned to one side.


    Quote Originally Posted by Grannie G View Post
    When we sit on benches at the seaside, he keeps sliding down.
    John started to do this after his infection, in fact that's how he got the sores on his heels. He has to have a reclining chair, because he can't sit upright.

    I put it down to his loss of balance.


    Hazel
    Carer


    Don't grieve for what you have lost, rejoice for what you have had.
     

  9. #9
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    Ron has been leaning to one side when in a sitting position for almost two years.
    In the car I have to correct him, he also makes it impossible to change gear.
    In bed due to his Parkinsons, there is one position, on his back. he cannot turn himself over. He has developed hard dry skin on one heel, this is the heel he tries to move his body on.
    I have now got him a heel protector, I strap it on every night, coupled with lots of cream to stop the dry skin. It is working

    Just keep an eye open, and watch for anything, it is all we can do.
    Barb XX & Ron ZZZ
     

  10. #10
    coupled with lots of cream to stop the dry skin
    Having followed Hazel's thread on her John and his heels, I am always most particular about Lionel's heels. His feet need attention anyway because of his diabetis, especially as he is virtually bedbound.

    and watch for anything, it is all we can do.
    And learn from each other.
    Connie

    Carer and Volunteer Moderator

    "Today is as good as it gets" - Lionel, upon diagnosis 2002
     

  11. #11
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    Hi,
    My mam would often lean to one side for a a few days or so and then straighten up again for a while until it happened again.
    With her having vascular dementia we put it down to mini strokes or something but it does seem very common reading the posts on here. She would also lean backwards sometimes to the point where someone would have to walk behind her as well as to the side to make sure she didn't fall. Mam wasn't on any medication at all for her dementia as she had a really bad reaction to any drugs so we knew it wasn't that. It seems that some things unfortunately cannot be explained yet this is where much more research is needed into this awful illness.

    love
    barbara h
    Last edited by barbara h; 05-10-2008 at 09:34 PM.
     

  12. #12
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    Dear Barbara h

    She would also lean backwards sometimes to the point where someone would have to walk behind her as well as to the side to make sure she didn't fall. Mam wasn't on any medication at all for her dementia

    Ron, when he stands asks me to straighten up, he tells me I am bending. No, it is he who is bending. It is balance that goes.
    Ron is not on any medication.
    Barb & Ron
     

  13. #13
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    H Barb and Ron, this is not just applicable to AD sufferers, I have a chronic back problem for 20 odd years and can really only sleep safely on my left side (with a rolled up towel for support). Occasionaly I can manage to roll over either onto by back or onto my right side for ten minutes or so. I too have devloped hard and painful skin on my right foot in doing this maneuvre, but I have to say that nobody cares about it all in my case, I don't think I have even told my husband, so can you tell me what to do about it? E45 cream is all I use, but is there something better?

    Margaret
     

  14. #14
    Just to say dad started this gait/posture leaning about a year ago, mainly when he walks which is mostly aided these days.

    Interestingly enough, from looking at the pictures, dad also leans to the left. I visited dad this weekend and am getting worried about the physical changes which seem to be getting worse. Ironically he is mentally better in some ways blurting out whole sentances again. But physically the changes are much more noticeable. The physical changes are having an impact on dads health as he is obviously getting less excercise now which causes other problems. Dad and the whole family struggle with these changes

    hey ho, onward and forward
    Craig
    Volunteer Moderator since 2003 (recently retired) - PLEASE be mindful and respectful; everything you post on Talking Point is viewed by people with dementia as well as carers. This forum is here to support people with dementia and carers. My father died from Alzheimer's - April 2012.
     

  15. #15
    Terry, I do have a few comments. I'm not trying to be rude, but they do come from experience. I agree with Hazel about the balance theory....as mom lost her ablity to walk and hold herself up she also lost her ablity to sit up straight. When I would take her places I would have to sit her in the car then reposition her seatbelt with little pillows to keep her upright. When she was still walking I would constantly have to remind her to stand up tall or she would fall over!

    The swollen tummy does concern me! Mom had several mini tias during the last several months of her life and that is capable of rendering the bladder ineffective. Is she still voiding as she used to? Is her urine dark? Mom had this happen to her and spent a week in the hospital. When we took her there she was catheterized and 2 1/2 liters of urine was taken from her bladder. She was put on some major antibiotics bbecause as this can cause some major infections in the body. She went home with a catheter and bag and was to never not have one again. Her urologist explained it to me this way. When you are born your brain automatically gives orders for your bladder to work. Most of the time with a spinal cord injury your brain still gives those orders. With a stroke it doesn't always do that. In a person without dimentia it is possible for that ability to come back over time. With AZ patients it usually does not because of the lapse of memory. Hospitals have littlle portable sonogram machines that are made for the nurses to check out how full the bladder is. Do they have one? A full bladder on mom reminded me of what I thought she may have looked like pregnant. ONce the urine was released she lost that swollen tummy almost immediately.

    I hope this isn't the case and someone is able to find an reason that is more friendly.

    HUGS

    Nancy
     

 

 

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